The Necromancer’s Daughter Book Tour: Day 4

Welcome to Day 4 of The Necromancer’s Daughter’s Book Tour!

I hope you enjoy:

~ A lovely community of bloggers. My hosts are bloggers who are always willing to lend a hand, share a laugh, and build a friendship.

~ My favorite book from my host’s list, along with my review.

~ Something to make you smile. 

~ Something short and different about The Necromancer’s Daughter (follow the link below).

~ Leave a comment on my hosts’ sites, and your name will be entered in an end-of-tour drawing for a $50 Amazon gift certificate. The more sites, the more entries!

Day 4, here we go!

Teri Polen’s Blog: Books and Such

Teri is an author of sci-fi and horror short stories and novels, and she recently released the second book in The Colony Series (The Insurgent), which I highly recommend. She’s also an avid book reviewer of indie books as well as books acquired through NetGalley. She leans toward sci-fi, fantasy, suspense, horror, thrillers, and mysteries, but her reviews certainly aren’t limited to those genres. She keeps my kindle on the chunky side.

I’ve caught her short stories in anthologies, and I’ve read all of her books. I wish she’d write them faster! Here’s my review of the first book in her The Colony duology:

Subject A36 (The Colony Series) by Teri Polen

My Review: I should never have read this book, because now I have to wait for the next one in the series, and that’s going to be torture! This read is sooo good.

Asher, the first-person protagonist, is a 17-year-old member of a resistance group fighting the Colony. The Colony steals attractive children (and adults) from outlying communities and kills them by stripping their DNA to serve the vanity of its citizens. Asher’s group is part of a larger network focused on freeing Colony captives before their DNA is harvested.

The plot moves along quickly and requires some suspension of belief as these teens have exceptional skills. There are twists and turns and secrets that I didn’t see coming and thoroughly enjoyed. This isn’t a story that gets bogged down with description. The science and technology are developed just enough to be believable.

The characters are beautifully crafted, and there’s none of the annoying teen angst and dumb choices that I find in many YA stories. These characters are in dangerous situations and maturity is a matter of survival. I enjoyed the authenticity. The somewhat heavy backstory in the beginning pays off as the characters develop and the events become more and more emotionally charged. Asher, his friend Noah, and lover Brynn make up the three main characters. I liked all three but was particularly enamored with Asher. I thoroughly believed his inner world, emotions, and choices. He’s a noble character, faced with tough decisions. I was hooked.

Then the book ended with a cliffhanger, and I had a literary heart attack. Highly recommended to YA and adult readers of sci-fi. Get ready for an intense adventure.

***

If you have a chance, head on over to join The Necromancer’s Daughter tour at Teri’s blog: Books and Such.

The Necromancer’s Daughter Book Tour: Day 3

Welcome to Day 3 of The Necromancer’s Daughter’s Book Tour!

I hope that each tour stop offers something fresh and fun. Here’s what you can expect:

~ A lovely community of bloggers. My hosts are bloggers who are always willing to lend a hand, share a laugh, and build a friendship. Enjoy!

~ They’re talented too!  Before I send you off to each tour stop, I’ll share my favorite book from the blogger’s list along with my review.

~ Something to make you smile.  I’ve been collecting memes to leave you with a grin.

~ You’ll find something short and different about The Necromancer’s Daughter: a snippet, a tidbit about a character, some thoughts about the story, or the struggle writing it. (Follow the link below).

~ And last but not least, if you comment on my host’s site, your name will be entered in an end-of-tour drawing for a $50 Amazon gift certificate. The more sites, the more entries!

Day 3, here we go!

Author D. L. Finn’s Blog

Denise is a writer and poet who’s also a voracious book reader and reviewer. Her love of nature and its creatures comes through loud and clear in her stories and poetry, as does her gracious, positive spirit. She’s a member of the Story Empire where she shares her expertise on the craft of writing through a wide range of articles. Her blog is a great source for indie book reviews, info on new releases, and her own syllabic poetry.

I’ve read almost all of her books, and she writes in a wide range of genres from poetry collections to horror, suspense, and gentle YA tales.  Here’s her latest:

A Voice in the Silence by D. L. Finn

My Review: Drea, a recent widow, lives alone in her home far from town. There’s a serial killer roaming the area and a winter storm on the way. But what initially finds its way into her home isn’t a murderer, but a trio of animals who’ve escaped from a lab—a dog, a cat, and a rat. And before she knows it, they’re doing things that no animals should be able to do. They talk.

Suspension of disbelief was a necessity for this book. In some ways, the fantastical abilities of the animals gave the story a whimsical, childlike innocence. But that quality is countered by the presence of a serial killer outside in the storm, and the suspense intensifies when Drea finds his footprints in the snow. With the help of her animal family, a ghost, and a caring police officer, she just might get through the storm alive.

Three major plot lines thread through the story, and each comes to its own satisfying climax rather than all resolving at the end. The main protagonists are well-rounded characters, and that includes the animals. My favorites were Drea, Adam, and Charlie the dog. The villains range from mentally ill to completely deranged. The story unfolds primarily from Drea’s perspective though the overall POV is omniscient.

The pace is good, and the descriptions gave a clear picture of the action and setting. There’s a romantic undercurrent and some violence, including an off-stage suicide. Overall, I’d say this book is suitable for YA and adult audiences, and I recommend it to readers who enjoy paranormal stories and want to try something whimsical, suspenseful, and entirely different

***

If you have a chance, head on over to join The Necromancer’s Daughter tour at Denise’s blog: Author D. L. Finn.

The Necromancer’s Daughter Book Tour: Day 2

Welcome to Day 2 of The Necromancer’s Daughter’s Book Tour!

I hope that each tour stop offers something fresh and fun. Here’s what you can expect:

~ A lovely community of bloggers. My hosts are bloggers who are always willing to lend a hand, share a laugh, and build a friendship. Enjoy!

~ They’re talented too!  Before I send you off to each tour stop, I’ll share my favorite book from my host’s list along with my review. There’s room in your chubby kindle, right?

~ Something to make you smile.  I’ve been collecting memes and images to leave you with a grin.

~ You’ll find something short and different about The Necromancer’s Daughter: today, a short note about the inspiration for the book and the title. (Follow the link below).

~ And last but not least, if you comment on my host’s site, your name will be entered in an end-of-tour drawing for a $50 Amazon gift certificate. Multiply your chances by leaving a comment on each post of the tour.

Day 2, here we go!

Colleen Chesebro’s Wordcraft Poetry Blog

Colleen is one of those writers, poets, editors, and bloggers that makes me wonder where she finds time to sleep. Her poetry blog is ranked among the top ten at RankedBlogs.com!

Wordcraft Poetry is how I know her best. “Colleen created Word Craft Poetry as an uplifting community where poets can learn the basics of writing Japanese and American syllabic poetry by sharing their own poetic inspiration within a weekly poetry challenge.” It’s super fun to learn about the forms and participate in Colleen’s Tanka Tuesday challenges. And that’s only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to what she offers. Check out her site for book recommendations and flash fiction too.

I’ve read all of her books as well as the anthologies that she’s created with her Tanka Tuesday participants. Her work includes poetry, short stories, a YA novel, and a “must have” book for poets wishing to craft syllabic poetry, which I’ll share here:

Word Craft: Prose & Poetry: The Art of Crafting Syllabic Poetry by Colleen Chesebro

My Review: This book is a must-have for writers of syllabic poetry. Chesebro has the experience and credentials to have crafted this easy-to-follow and detailed look at twelve forms of Japanese and American syllabic poetry, as well as their variations. Styles range from the well-known haiku and tanka to the less familiar gogyohka and etheree. Though written for poets beginning their exploration of these beautiful forms, I learned quite a lot (and I’ve been writing several of the forms for years).

Chesebro’s explanations not only include the technical aspects of each poetic form, but a quick history, the style’s creative intent, and tips for finding inspiration and for writing. These aspects of each poetic form are conveyed in a concise manner, and each section is followed by examples of her poetry and the poetry of authors I’ve enjoyed for years. The poems not only illustrate the preceding lesson but are beautiful in their own right.

The quality of this book and its citations make it useful as a “textbook” on the craft of writing syllabic poetry, appropriate for academic settings. Chesebro’s conversational style, easy-to-understand explanations, and poetic selections also make it accessible to a wide range of learners. The book’s format lends itself to lesson planning for young poets.

Highly recommended to poets who are just starting out or who’ve been writing for years. An excellent learning tool filled with wonderful examples of the forms.

***

If you have a chance, head on over to join The Necromancer’s Daughter at Colleen’s blog: Wordcraft Poetry.

The Necromancer’s Daughter Book Tour: Day 1

Welcome to Day 1 of The Necromancer’s Daughter’s Book Tour!

Greetings! It’s been a busy 2022 with writing, family health hurdles, travel, and publishing. Paperbacks arrived yesterday, bringing a contented sigh.

Now, it’s time to spread the word, and my goal is to make this tour different from the usual “buy my book” spiel.

I hope that each tour stop offers something fresh and fun. Here’s what you can expect:

~ A lovely community of bloggers. My hosts are bloggers who are always willing to lend a hand, share a laugh, and build a friendship. Enjoy!

~ They’re talented too!  Before I send you off to each tour stop, I’ll share a favorite book from my host’s list along with my review. There’s room in your kindle, right?

~ Something to make you smile.  I’ve been collecting memes and images to leave you with a grin.

~ You’ll find something about The Necromancer’s Daughter: a snippet, a tidbit about a character, some thoughts about the story, or the struggle writing it. Something different each day. (Follow the link below.)

~ And last but not least, if you comment on my host’s site, your name will be entered in an end-of-tour drawing for a $50 Amazon gift certificate. Multiply your chances by leaving a comment on each post of the tour.

Here we go!

First stop: Anneli Purchase’s Blog

Anneli is a writer and an editor, and she runs two active blogs.

Her editor’s blog is Anneli’s Place. Here she shares grammar and punctuation tips among other English language challenges. I’ve followed Anneli for years and learned a lot from her informative posts and examples. I almost have “lie, lay, laid, lain” down pat. I’m pleased to report that she edited The Necromancer’s Daughter, and if you notice any typos, those are the ones I added after she was done.

Her writer’s blog is Words from Anneli, a place to relax and enjoy her beautiful wildlife photos and lighthearted poems (as written by the furry and feathered inhabitants of her yard), as well as to learn about other day-to-day happenings on Canada’s wild Pacific coast.

I’ve read all of her books! She writes romance/thriller mash-ups.  Here’s my review of the first in a two-book series:

The Wind Weeps by Anneli Purchase

My Review: The Wind Weeps starts off as a romance and gradually shifts to a tension-filled walk on the high wire of domestic violence. Andrea is a naïve and insecure single woman who, despite warnings from her friends, rebounds after a very short relationship into the arms of a charming man with a dark side.

The story takes place in the Canadian Pacific Northwest, beautiful and rugged country where commercial fishermen make their living. The author’s familiarity with the area and with the details of the industry lend an incredible amount of authenticity to the narrative. As Andrea’s life becomes geographically isolated, she falls into more and more danger. I was on the edge of my seat.

The plot moves along at a good clip once things get tense. The writing is polished with well-rounded, consistent, and interesting characters. I wanted to shake some sense into Andrea in the beginning but was quickly caught up in her fearful situation and her determination to save herself. The book offers an honest look at domestic violence, including why women are sometimes slow to make a break. The story ends abruptly, but never fear, it continues with a second book: The Reckoning Tide. Recommended to readers who enjoy a mash-up of romance and suspense and plan to read both books.

***

If you have a chance, head on over to join The Necromancer’s Daughter tour at Anneli’s blog: Words from Anneli.

Taproot.com

Book Trailer: The Necromancer’s Daughter

My release of The Necromancer’s Daughter later this month is creeping ever closer. I love creating images for my books and then turning them into trailers. It’s a bit of procrastination that feels productive.

The trailer is complete, and it’s time to let it fly.

I hope you enjoy the show.

(If you give it a view, I recommend “full screen” so it isn’t so tiny.)

And … the book is officially available for preorder for an August 25th release (right around the corner)! Amazon, Kobo, B&N, Smashwords, and Apple.

The Necromancer’s Daughter will be $.99 for a few months as a thank you to all my blogging buddies and the readers, old and new, who’ve supported me along the way.

The Necromancer’s Daughter: Joreh

Joreh Graeger

Joreh is the last of my trio of main characters. You’ve met Barus and Aster. Joreh is my reluctant protagonist. The poor guy is riddled with ambivalence. I make all my characters suffer, but Joreh is the least sure of his convictions, and he more than the other characters will be forced to make the difficult choices between justice, faith, and love.

Below is a little snippet from his first POV chapter. I hope you enjoy it.

***

Lanterns lit the watchtowers, and guards held up the gleaming gold haloes in the rising squall. The bonfire in the square hissed and thrashed like a demon in iron chains, and Joreh longed to stand before it and forget the girl. The caravan had departed, and the square lay empty as residents sheltered in their homes. The woodsmen headed for the tavern.

He glanced at Aster, impatient for instructions. She waited in the blowing snow for him or whatever would befall her next. Three stiff-backed soldiers approached from the barracks. At the same time, the inn’s door swung open and several brothers of the Red Order descended the steps, his father in the lead.

She stepped back, but surrounded by men from the outpost, she lacked anywhere to run. Joreh grabbed her arm. She shook in his grip, and any strength or confidence he’d witnessed during their short trek vanished. What little color rosied her cheeks drained from her face, and her eyes sought his, white-rimmed with panic. His father terrified her. How did she even know him?

“Well done, Joreh. I’d assumed we’d lost her. How fitting that you’re the one to deliver her to the Blessed One’s justice.” His father clapped him on the back and gestured to a soldier. “Secure her in a cage.”

Her gaze flitted to the dangling cages, and Joreh grimaced, wishing they could get this over with, quietly and honorably, without the displays of intimidation. If they locked her in a cage, she’d freeze to death before morning. He drew a knife from his wide sash and cut the bindings on her wrists, eager to follow the woodsmen into the tavern. “It’s too cold in the cages. Lock her up inside or chain her in the stable.”

She rubbed blood into her strangled hands and edged nearer to him as if he held the key to her salvation. He possessed no such thing. Nor did he want it.

His father looked down his nose at her. “She doesn’t require coddling. She’s dead. And if there’s any question, come morning, we’ll hang her.”

“She hasn’t been tried.” Joreh scraped a hand over his scowl. “You can’t execute her without the goddess’s judgment.”

His father raised an eyebrow. “Oh, my son, watch me. The Blessed One requires no trial for this one. She’s far from innocent. Her very existence is a testament to evil.” He grabbed the collar of her cloak and yanked her toward the fire. She cried out, writhing like a wild thing as she fumbled with the clasp.

Joreh staggered after them. Would his father throw her into the flames? That he even asked himself such a question dismayed him.

The cloak’s brooch popped. Aster dropped to the mud, and the vicar tossed the garment into the fire. He beckoned to the soldiers. “Take her to the cage.”

Joreh gritted his teeth as his father eyed him, daring him to utter a challenge. Two soldiers lowered a wooden cage. A blade prodded her to the cell, and she stumbled inside. She gripped the wooden bars as the rope drew taut through its pulley and lifted her prison, swaying and creaking, into the air. Snow fell through the bars unimpeded. Joreh stamped his frozen feet as the woman curled into the cage’s corner, too far from the fire to feel its warmth. Wrapped in his cloak, he trailed his father into the inn.

Thanks for dropping by and reading!

The Necromancer’s Daughter: Aster

With a book launch on the horizon, I’ve started introducing my three main characters. This is Aster, a young woman who was born dead and resurrected by Barus, the necromancer. He’s raised her as his own, and though he’s warned her away from dragons… she can’t find it in herself to be afraid.

I hope you enjoy this (slightly modified) snippet introducing Aster.

***

As it always did, the tide of emotion started as a trickle of anticipation at the base of Aster’s spine. The swelling excitement flowed into her chest, and her fingers tingled. It spread over her skin and rushed into her face. The feelings belonged to the dragon, not to her, but she’d become accustomed to the foreign sensations thrumming through her bones.

The dragon whooshed up the cliff into the ether, nearly knocking her from her feet. Whipped-up wind thrust her grandmother’s blue shawl open, and it flapped from her shoulders like a fledgling’s untested wings. Her fine white hair whirled with the blowing snow. Though she’d expected the creature’s striking entrance, she laughed in surprise.

The beast’s leathery wings angled for a spiraling descent far above her head. Sunlight shone through the webbing, enhancing the mottle of silver and black. She’d encountered this one many times before and raised an arm to wave. “Come down. I’m not afraid.” Would it finally heed her call? A gift for her eighteenth awakening day?

A scar striped the dragon’s snout, jagged as a thunderbolt. Its long neck arched, ruby eyes gleaming as its head dipped toward her, jaws agape. Curved incisors glinted in the raw light, and the serpentine tail snapped at the frozen stalks of asters quivering in the wind.

Barus had told her, long ago, to hide behind a tree and make herself small, and for years, she’d obeyed his wishes. But no more. If the dragon meant to terrify her, it had failed every time. She trusted her instincts, knew to her core that the creature wouldn’t shred her to pieces or whisk her away in its teeth.

But what about an apple?

She reached for the armor of scales as the massive body undulated above her, its back bristling with spikes, clawed feet sweeping the air just beyond her fingertips as she held an apple aloft. The beast circled, rising higher.

“Come down,” she teased, giving the wrinkled fruit a toss. “I brought an apple for you.”

The dragon’s wings swept back, and it dove from the cornflower sky. Aster shrieked and flung the apple. The toothsome jaws snapped the fruit from the air, and she laughed with delight.

As though in answer, the beast bellowed a cry and plummeted beyond the cliff’s wall. Aster darted to the edge as the dragon’s wings unfurled, capturing the wind with the ripple and snap of a galleon’s sails. The colossal beast skimmed the gray sea, flying for the Isles of White Sands glimmering like a mirage on the horizon.

As the drumming of wings surrendered to the waves’ roar, another sound assumed its place. The voices of men.

***

Thanks for reading!

The Necromancer’s Daughter, and initial thoughts about Vella

I decided to give Vella a try.

In a nutshell, Amazon’s latest program (beta in the US for now) allows authors to publish new stories in serial episodes that readers can access though tokens. (The first three episodes of every serial are free — no fiddling with the tokens required). Readers can “thumbs up” episodes they enjoy and thereby push them up in visibility.

For authors who have published their episodic writing on programs like Wattpad, this is a great way to leverage their fanbase and earn revenue. Over a thousand fantasy stories showed up on Vella on the first day, and one had over a thousand “thumbs up.”

It wasn’t mine. Lol.

The Necromancer’s Daughter Blurb

The mechanics of setting up a Vella story, posting episodes, and editing them is easy… because there aren’t a lot of options. I don’t mind that, though some authors seem to want more formatting flexibility.

The cost per episode to the reader (after the first free ones) is pennies, and as far as I can tell, the author’s accumulated revenue after 80k words, is about the same as a kindle sale.

I’m undecided about whether Vella and I are a good fit, but I’m committed. Writing and publishing in episodes is nerve-wracking and instantly gratifying for those adrenaline junkies who enjoy hitting the Publish button with every “chapter.”

And when the serial story is finished, authors can always delete it and republish it as a book. In that regard, no effort is wasted. And who knows, we might pick up a few new readers along the way.

If you have the time and want to see what this is all about… (Update 9/17/21. I deleted the story! For reasons my check out my post: Why I deleted my Vella story. )

You can also check out the Serial-Pro Teagan Geneviene’s story: Pride and Flowers, Prejudice and Dirigibles.

Have you considered Vella as an author or reader? Any first impressions?

If you have a Vella story in the works, feel free to share the link.