Smorgasbord Bookshelf – New Book on the Shelves -#Pre-order August 25th – #Fantasy – The Necromancer’s Daughter by D.Wallace Peach

Many thanks to Sally Cronin for generously sharing my new book, on preorder now, but releasing in 3 days! She also caught a wonderful review of The Ferryman and the Sea Witch. What a way to start my Monday. Thanks, Sally.

Comments are closed here. If you head over to Sally’s, be sure to wander through her wonderful site and take a browse through her collection of books. I’ve read almost every one and highly recommend them. ❤

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

Delighted to share the news of the latest release by D.Wallace Peach the much anticipated The Necromancer’s Daughter available on pre-order for just another two days until August 25th.

About the book

A healer with the talent to unravel death. A stillborn child brought to life. A father lusting for vengeance. And a son torn between justice, faith, and love. Caught in a chase spanning kingdoms, each must decide the nature of good and evil, the lengths they will go to survive, and what they are willing to lose.

A healer and dabbler in the dark arts of life and death, Barus is as gnarled as an ancient tree. Forgotten in the chaos of the dying queen’s chamber, he spirits away her stillborn infant and in a hovel at the meadow’s edge, breathes life into the wisp of a child. He names her Aster for the lea’s white flowers. Raised…

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Chekhov’s Gun

I’m over at Story Empire today with a post about forecasting, and the principle of Chekhov’s Gun. If you have a minute or two, stop by to say hello. Happy Writing!

Story Empire

Hello Storytellers. Diana here with playwright and author Anton Chekhov to explore the principle of Chekhov’s Gun. I’d love to hear your thoughts at the end. Let’s get started…

Pixabay images unless otherwise noted.

Imagine you’re watching a movie. The good guy and the bad guy are just about to face off in the tool shed. As the camera shifts to the bad guy, you get a glimpse of a pointy meat hook hanging on a chain. Just a glance. But it’s enough to know that someone’s going to get hooked before the fight is over.

This is one example of “Chekhov’s Gun,” though Chekhov was referring to a gun on the mantel instead of a hook in the tool shed.

At the beginning of the year, Beem talked about sprinkling a story with clues for the Big Reveal (Here). This post is a bit of a spin off…

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Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Guest Post – #Life – I Wish I Knew Then What I Know Now! by Diana Peach

I’m over at Sally Cronin’s today, participating in her wonderful series “I wish I knew then what I know now.” I’ve caught as many of these posts as I can. It’s been a pleasure to learn more about other bloggers on a deeper level than our love of books. Sally reinforces for me why I have such a big spot in my heart for you all. If you have a moment, stop by at Sally’s marvelous blog to say hi. ❤

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

I am sure like me, there have been times when you have wondered what difference might have been made to your life, if your younger self had been gifted with the experience and knowledge you have accumulated over the years.

I invited several friends from the writing community to share their thoughts on this subject which I am sure you will enjoy as much as I did.

Today author Diana Wallace Peach shares her thoughts on the prompt and how low moments and the high points in our lives are all part of the journey.

I wish I knew then what I know now by Diana Peach

Diana in 1977

The invitation from Sally to share our reflections on “I wish I knew then what I know now” has delivered some wonderful and personal responses from the blogging community.

Most who’ve submitted have confessed to taking some time to reflect…

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16 Reasons to read your work aloud

I’m back from exploring canyons (pictures coming soon), but today I’m over at the Story Empire with another post about writing. If you have a moment, stop by and say hi.

Story Empire

All images Pixabay

Most writers have learned the importance of reading their words aloud. It’s advice I heeded early on and am happy to pass along.

Writing works on myriad levels. On one level, it’s the mechanical delivery of a story, the typing of words according to rules. It’s fingers on keyboards, reams of paper, and editing drafts. Beneath the surface, writing is meaning-making through narrative, tapping out universal themes and archetypes that existed before man first etched his carvings into cave walls.

As an art form, writing has the ability to transport a reader into another world. We paint with words on the mind’s canvas, compose the music of language, stirsmells, tastes, and tactile impressions. The goal is emotionalimmersion, being present in the experience.

I have anirksome sensitivity to the sounds of words and the rhythm of phrases and sentences. When I search for the right word, it’s not…

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Off to Explore some Canyons

All images from Pixaby

I’m vanishing from the blog for a few weeks to explore some canyons, starting with the one above.

One of the benefits of retirement is an opportunity to catch up on all those things I wanted to do earlier in my life, but never had the opportunity. While I’m not quite the daredevil I was as a younger person, the desire to explore is still as strong as ever.

I want to see curving waves of rock. Perhaps this one:

I hope to explore a slot canyon. Maybe this one:

I won’t need to rely on pixabay photos to see this. I’m going to walk through it:

I will be offline for most of my break, but loaded with books, and back with much to share.

May you find an adventure to enjoy while I’m gone.

***

And a Happy Mother’s Day to the women all around the world who are tirelessly “mothering” others, even if you don’t have children. You’re amazing.

Crafting Rich Characters (Part 5)

Greetings Storytellers! I’m over at Story Empire today with the last installment of “Crafting Rich Characters.” If you’re interested, there’s a worksheet with prompts from the entire series for your downloading pleasure. If you have the time, stop by to say hi. 🙂

Story Empire

Greetings Storytellers! We’re off to Part 5 of Crafting Rich Characters, the final installment of this series. In Part 1, we explored a character’s Physical Appearance, Mannerisms, and Quirks. In Part 2, we covered Attributes and Traits, Skills and Abilities, and Occupations and Interests. In Part 3, we looked at the Formative Backstory, Core Values, and The Lie. And in Part 4, we explored Secrets, The Big Fear, and The Mask.

In this post, we’re going to finish up character-building with Motivations and Goals.

And at the end, you’ll be able to download a worksheet with the aspects of character-building I’ve presented in this 5-part series.

Motivation

All images from Pixabay

Motivation liesat the heart of a compelling character’s profile. Much of what we’ve talked about in previous posts will contribute to an understanding of a character’s internal motivation.

Motivations and Goals are often confused since…

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The Dudes aren’t in the kitchen with D. Wallace Peach.

I’m over at Shehanne Moore’s blog, getting interviewed by the Hamsters. Shey also wrote a wonderful review of Catling’s Bane, though you have to read through the hamsters’ hilarious commentary first. If you have a moment, stop by, and don’t forget to check out Shey’s fabulous regency-era romances. I highly recommend them. ❤

shehanne moore

D. Wallace Peach.Thanks so much for the invite to visit with you and the Dudes, Shey. What a treat to hobnob with the famous (infamous?) Hamstas. Hi guys.

Question one. · Fantasy can stand or fall on the world building and making a reader completely believe in that world. When you first sat down to write Catling’s Bane, what came first, the world she inhabits or Catling?

D. Wallace Peach. For me, both happen at the same time. Usually, the theme comes first – in this case, the ability to manipulate emotions. That bit of inspiration starts a cascade of character, world, and plot ideas that inform each other as the story takes shape. Not until that magic has run its course, do I begin writing.

D. Wallace Peach. Oh I am definitely a plotter. And I wrote all four books before I published the first. That…

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Smorgasbord Bookshelf 2022- Share an Extract from your latest book – #Fantasy #Adventure – The Ferryman and the Sea Witch by D.Wallace Peach

I’ve been a busy bee this week dealing with piles of SNOW, rare in Oregon and unheard of in April! The power came back on just in time to share Sally Cronin’s generous post. I’m over at her place today with an excerpt from The Ferryman and the Sea Witch. If you have a few minutes, head on over to say hi. And don’t forget to check out Sally’s site. ❤

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

In this series you are invited to share an extract of 500 words from your most recent book published within the last 12 months. Details at the end of the post.

The aim of the series

  1. To showcase your latest book and sell some more copies.
  2. Gain more reviews for the book.
  3. Promote a selection of your other books that are available.

Today I am delighted to share an extract from from the fantasy adventure which I can highly recommend by D.Wallace PeachThe Ferryman and the Sea Witch

About the book

The merrow rule the sea. Slender creatures, fair of face, with silver scales and the graceful tails of angelfish. Caught in a Brid Clarion net, the daughter of the sea witch perishes in the sunlit air. Her fingers dangle above the swells.

The queen of the sea bares her sharp teeth and, in a fury of wind…

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Crafting Rich Characters (Part 4)

I just sent a manuscript off to beta readers, and I’m celebrating today with another post over at Story Empire – Part 4 of Crafting Rich Characters. If you have a minute and want to go deep into your characters’ psyches, stop on by. I’d love to chat. Happy Writing.

Story Empire

Greetings Storytellers! We’re off to Part 4 of Crafting Rich Characters. In Part 1, we explored a character’s physical appearance, mannerisms, and quirks. In Part 2, we covered Attributes and Traits, Skills and Abilities, and Occupations and Interests. And in Part 3, we looked at the Formative Backstory, Core Values, and The Lie.

In this post, we’re going to explore some of my favorite parts of character building: Secrets, The Big Fear, and The Mask. We’ll look at the juicy parts of the characters that create tension, obstacles, and perhaps some mystery.

Secrets

All images from Pixabay

Now things get a little interesting. Where The Lie (Part 3) covered information the character doesn’t know, now we’re talking about things the character knows and doesn’t want anyone else to find out.

Secrets are secrets for a reason; they involve risk. Some secrets are small – the “homemade” pie…

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