The Necromancer’s Daughter – by: D. Wallace Peach

Today, I’m sharing a post created by Resa, our glamorous friend from fashion and film. Resa creates spectacular one-of-a-kind gowns, all stitched by hand from reclaimed materials (table runners, drapes, and found fabrics). They’re truly stunning, with a powerful message about sustainability and what’s possible with vision and effort. But her artistic talents don’t stop there.

After reading The Necromancer’s Daughter, she put her creativity to work again, drawing gowns for my character Aster. Combined with her photos of dragon murals and a whimsical interview, she’s pulled together a wonderfully entertaining post. I hope you join us for some beauty, laughter, and fun. And check out her gowns!

Art Gowns

Monarchy, religion, culture and love collide in ancient China’s warring society. All come to rest upon the shoulders of Aster, a gentle soul content in her life. At the start of this tale, her dead infant body is stolen from her mother, the  Queen of Verdane. Aster is brought back to life by Barus. Barus becomes her father, the only one she knows & loves.

Resa – Why &/or how did you come up withe the name Aster?

Peach – That’s an easy one.  She’s so pale that she reminded Barus of the white asters that grew in the meadows around his home. I imagined that when in bloom the flowers almost looked like snow.

Resa – I just have to ask, ” When did you discover the idea of “necromancy” … that it could bring people back to life?

Peach – Great question! Necromancy is (or was) a real…

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Happy New Year from the Muse

pixabay image by Amy Art-Dreams

“What are you doing?” she asks.

“Making lists.” I look up from where I’m slouched on the sofa.

“Procrastinating.” A hand on her hip, my muse mugs a dark-eyed, straight-lipped face that fully expresses her annoyance. She’s dressed like a forest nymph with twigs, pinecones, and fireflies in her hair. Winter’s snowflakes cling to her midnight dress, and a white owl blinks at me from her shoulder.

“I’m trying to get organized for the new year.” I toss my notepad aside, and before I can stop her, she snatches it up and starts flipping through the pages.

“You had a sorrowful few months, and I’m sympathetic, but the new year has started, and books don’t write themselves.” The owl steps from her shoulder onto her forearm, and with a sharp lift of her wrist, she sends it up into the cabin’s beams.

She sinks down on the couch beside me, rustles the crimson autumn leaves along her hem, and puts her grass-stained feet up on the coffee table. A pencil appears behind her ear that she uses to critique my ideas. “What’s with all these non-writing items?” She starts crossing them off.

“Not everything can be ignored indefinitely.” My protests slide from her skin, and I shrug. I’ll just tack those items on the end after she leaves. “I have a lot of my mom’s keepsakes to distribute, photo albums to consolidate, and my dad needs more of my time now. I haven’t vacuumed in a month.”

“Pfft. Housework.” She scratches that one out so hard the paper tears. “Just don’t get it dirty.”

Obviously, the muse hasn’t ever lived in a house. “I think a schedule might help me feel less overwhelmed.”

“Fine. Here’s one I recommend.” She rips a page from the notebook and hands it to me. “You get one day a week for non-writing activities. Sunday. The rest of the week, if you’re not with your father, you’re mine.”

I stare at the blank paper as black ink spiders from one corner to the other, creating a calendar complete with to-do items. She’s revamped my blogging schedule, dedicated a half-day for marketing, and blocked off chunks of time to write. There’s fine print along the bottom and a place to sign my name. “Is this a contract?”

“I’m a busy muse, and I’m not going to waste my time with undisciplined authors.”

I don’t argue and sign my name, figuring I’ll try it. She tears the calendar in half, and somehow we each end up with a full copy including my signature. “When do I start?”

I generated this image using Mid Journey’s AI software.

“Tomorrow.” She rises from my sofa. Spring petals flutter to the floor from her cloak of moss. The snowy owl wings to her shoulder. “You have work to do on your new book.”

I raise my eyebrows. “Which is?”

She smiles. “The working title is The Weaver and the Autumn Prince. I’ll leave the outline beside your laptop. Happy New Year.”

She winks at me and vanishes in a swirl of snowflakes and white feathers. I study the calendar, vaguely hopeful.

***

Apparently, I’ll be blogging on Tuesdays and Saturdays, with Saturdays reserved for sharing community blog posts and blogger books. Friday is marketing day. Comments are welcome, as always, and I’ll continue to reciprocate as well as visit all the blogs I enjoy.

And best of all, five days a week have a 4-hour slot set aside for writing.


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The Necromancer’s Daughter Book Tour: Day 26 (2 stops to go)

Welcome to Day 26 of The Necromancer’s Daughter’s Book Tour!

I hope you enjoy:

~ My favorite book from my host’s list, along with my review.

~ Something from or about The Necromancer’s Daughter (follow the link below).

~ Leave a comment on my hosts’ sites, and your name will be entered in a drawing for a $50 Amazon gift certificate. The more tour sites, the more entries!

Day 26, here we go!

Gwen Plano’s Blog: Reflections

Gwen’s blog is primarily a poetry blog as she participates in Colleen Chesebro’s Tanka Tuesday syllabic poetry challenges. Her poetry is beautiful and serene and reflective of her beautiful and serene personality. If you want to take a deep breath and relaxing sigh, it’s a place to visit. Gwen also shares new book releases for fellow bloggers, and she’s a contributor to The Story Empire writer’s blog where she shares her writing experience and tips.

Gwen has written a lovely memoir “Letting Go Into Perfect Love” as well as a military paranormal thriller series that began as a collaboration with author John Howell. I’m two books into the series and can’t wait to dive into the third.

Here’s a review of the first in the series:

The Choice: the unexpected heroes by Gwen Plano

My Review: This is Book Two in the series and it follows two weeks on the heels of Book One, The Contract. The Contract ended with a foiled assassination attempt on the President of the USA from within the government. Global repercussions were avoided, but important lives were lost. The international plot has yet to be investigated and those accountable brought to justice. That’s the focus of this read.

Admiral Joseph Parker is joined by civilian Donna Tucker and Airforce Public Relations employee Jim Andersen at Begert Airforce Base to begin the investigation. A trustworthy team forms and most of the book focuses on tracking down clues and following leads. The investigation is complex but logical and easy to follow.

And it’s not all routine work as the guilty parties are still at large. As the investigation gets closer to discovering the depth and breadth of the conspiracy, anyone with information that might break open the case starts dying. A sense of urgency intensifies as the bodies stack up and the death threats zero in on the team. The third-person present tense POV adds to the sense of immediacy.

I liked all of the characters, particularly the team of protagonists. They’re smart, and they care deeply about what happened and about getting to the truth. Aside from the thrills, there are romantic subplots as well as a paranormal/spiritual element to the story. The book ends with a cliff-hanger, so readers should be prepared to read onward. Highly recommended to fans of military thrillers.

***

If you have a chance, head on over to join The Necromancer’s Daughter tour at Gwen’s blog: Reflections.

Smorgasbord Bookshelf – New Book on the Shelves -#Pre-order August 25th – #Fantasy – The Necromancer’s Daughter by D.Wallace Peach

Many thanks to Sally Cronin for generously sharing my new book, on preorder now, but releasing in 3 days! She also caught a wonderful review of The Ferryman and the Sea Witch. What a way to start my Monday. Thanks, Sally.

Comments are closed here. If you head over to Sally’s, be sure to wander through her wonderful site and take a browse through her collection of books. I’ve read almost every one and highly recommend them. ❤

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

Delighted to share the news of the latest release by D.Wallace Peach the much anticipated The Necromancer’s Daughter available on pre-order for just another two days until August 25th.

About the book

A healer with the talent to unravel death. A stillborn child brought to life. A father lusting for vengeance. And a son torn between justice, faith, and love. Caught in a chase spanning kingdoms, each must decide the nature of good and evil, the lengths they will go to survive, and what they are willing to lose.

A healer and dabbler in the dark arts of life and death, Barus is as gnarled as an ancient tree. Forgotten in the chaos of the dying queen’s chamber, he spirits away her stillborn infant and in a hovel at the meadow’s edge, breathes life into the wisp of a child. He names her Aster for the lea’s white flowers. Raised…

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Chekhov’s Gun

I’m over at Story Empire today with a post about forecasting, and the principle of Chekhov’s Gun. If you have a minute or two, stop by to say hello. Happy Writing!

Story Empire

Hello Storytellers. Diana here with playwright and author Anton Chekhov to explore the principle of Chekhov’s Gun. I’d love to hear your thoughts at the end. Let’s get started…

Pixabay images unless otherwise noted.

Imagine you’re watching a movie. The good guy and the bad guy are just about to face off in the tool shed. As the camera shifts to the bad guy, you get a glimpse of a pointy meat hook hanging on a chain. Just a glance. But it’s enough to know that someone’s going to get hooked before the fight is over.

This is one example of “Chekhov’s Gun,” though Chekhov was referring to a gun on the mantel instead of a hook in the tool shed.

At the beginning of the year, Beem talked about sprinkling a story with clues for the Big Reveal (Here). This post is a bit of a spin off…

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Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Guest Post – #Life – I Wish I Knew Then What I Know Now! by Diana Peach

I’m over at Sally Cronin’s today, participating in her wonderful series “I wish I knew then what I know now.” I’ve caught as many of these posts as I can. It’s been a pleasure to learn more about other bloggers on a deeper level than our love of books. Sally reinforces for me why I have such a big spot in my heart for you all. If you have a moment, stop by at Sally’s marvelous blog to say hi. ❤

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

I am sure like me, there have been times when you have wondered what difference might have been made to your life, if your younger self had been gifted with the experience and knowledge you have accumulated over the years.

I invited several friends from the writing community to share their thoughts on this subject which I am sure you will enjoy as much as I did.

Today author Diana Wallace Peach shares her thoughts on the prompt and how low moments and the high points in our lives are all part of the journey.

I wish I knew then what I know now by Diana Peach

Diana in 1977

The invitation from Sally to share our reflections on “I wish I knew then what I know now” has delivered some wonderful and personal responses from the blogging community.

Most who’ve submitted have confessed to taking some time to reflect…

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16 Reasons to read your work aloud

I’m back from exploring canyons (pictures coming soon), but today I’m over at the Story Empire with another post about writing. If you have a moment, stop by and say hi.

Story Empire

All images Pixabay

Most writers have learned the importance of reading their words aloud. It’s advice I heeded early on and am happy to pass along.

Writing works on myriad levels. On one level, it’s the mechanical delivery of a story, the typing of words according to rules. It’s fingers on keyboards, reams of paper, and editing drafts. Beneath the surface, writing is meaning-making through narrative, tapping out universal themes and archetypes that existed before man first etched his carvings into cave walls.

As an art form, writing has the ability to transport a reader into another world. We paint with words on the mind’s canvas, compose the music of language, stirsmells, tastes, and tactile impressions. The goal is emotionalimmersion, being present in the experience.

I have anirksome sensitivity to the sounds of words and the rhythm of phrases and sentences. When I search for the right word, it’s not…

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Off to Explore some Canyons

All images from Pixaby

I’m vanishing from the blog for a few weeks to explore some canyons, starting with the one above.

One of the benefits of retirement is an opportunity to catch up on all those things I wanted to do earlier in my life, but never had the opportunity. While I’m not quite the daredevil I was as a younger person, the desire to explore is still as strong as ever.

I want to see curving waves of rock. Perhaps this one:

I hope to explore a slot canyon. Maybe this one:

I won’t need to rely on pixabay photos to see this. I’m going to walk through it:

I will be offline for most of my break, but loaded with books, and back with much to share.

May you find an adventure to enjoy while I’m gone.

***

And a Happy Mother’s Day to the women all around the world who are tirelessly “mothering” others, even if you don’t have children. You’re amazing.

Crafting Rich Characters (Part 5)

Greetings Storytellers! I’m over at Story Empire today with the last installment of “Crafting Rich Characters.” If you’re interested, there’s a worksheet with prompts from the entire series for your downloading pleasure. If you have the time, stop by to say hi. 🙂

Story Empire

Greetings Storytellers! We’re off to Part 5 of Crafting Rich Characters, the final installment of this series. In Part 1, we explored a character’s Physical Appearance, Mannerisms, and Quirks. In Part 2, we covered Attributes and Traits, Skills and Abilities, and Occupations and Interests. In Part 3, we looked at the Formative Backstory, Core Values, and The Lie. And in Part 4, we explored Secrets, The Big Fear, and The Mask.

In this post, we’re going to finish up character-building with Motivations and Goals.

And at the end, you’ll be able to download a worksheet with the aspects of character-building I’ve presented in this 5-part series.

Motivation

All images from Pixabay

Motivation liesat the heart of a compelling character’s profile. Much of what we’ve talked about in previous posts will contribute to an understanding of a character’s internal motivation.

Motivations and Goals are often confused since…

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