The Benefits of a Blogging Break

Kaau Crater, Hike, Hiking, Landscape, Hawaii, Clouds

I’m heading out to explore some volcanos.

Life’s been pretty hectic these past few months as my parents’ health continues to decline and obligations pile up. I’m good at not sweating the small stuff, but not everything can be ignored forever.

Blogging Breaks seem to work miracles for me in avoiding burnout and reinvigorating my enthusiasm for this time-consuming endeavor. Seeking balance has been an ongoing challenge as my blog grows and worldwide friendships form with people I care about. It doesn’t help that there’s wonderful content all over blogland. It’s hard to look away.

Several years ago, I tried taking weekends off from the blog, and it didn’t work. Notifications amassed, and I spent my Mondays staring at the laptop until my eyeballs shriveled. Days off due to other commitments brought similar results – a constant stream of busy-ness of one type or another and days of playing catch-up. My writing time suffered, and my husband started looking like a sad puppy.

Adorable, Animal, Beautiful, Bored, Breed, Brown

The question that frequently rambled through my head was, “How does anyone keep this up and not burn out?”

The answer to blog management, for me anyway, seems to be in taking longer breaks than a day or two. Dollie Freeman wrote a short article on the benefits of blogging breaks that rang true for me, and though the post isn’t available anymore, I kept her tips:

  • Don’t work for your blog – let your blog work for you.
  • Don’t sacrifice your home life, health, and relationships for the next post, the next series, the next promotion, the next…
  • Schedule one week per quarter where you will try not to blog – don’t post, don’t visit. Do something else that you enjoy – guilt free!
  • In addition to one week per quarter, Freeman suggested 4 additional weeks of unplanned ‘floating’ time to catch up, get ahead, work on a new product or just soak in the things that make your life meaningful.
  • Stay grounded and humble. Although your readers are interested in your blog, they aren’t hanging on to your every word. They’ll survive without you.
  • Life is too short to live it in front of a screen.
Woman, Jump, Backpack, Jumping, Leap, Adventure
All images – Pixabay

See you in a couple of weeks!

221 thoughts on “The Benefits of a Blogging Break

  1. Americaoncoffee says:

    Absolutely! We are all on this journey together. Thanks for the inspire! 🍮🍮❤️❤️🛌💤

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  2. Great post Diana, I like the advice!! Hope you have a great break from blogging!! Take Care!!

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  3. Wonder advice Diana, Enjoy your adventures, you bring so much to our table at WP, have a wonderful escape ! ❤️

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  4. All those points make a lot of sense, Diana. I’ve taken blogging breaks many times, all with positive results. I see other bloggers taking blogging breaks, some of whom carry on publishing posts but don’t read or comment on other blogs. That’s not a blogging break; it’s a break from reading and leaving comments.

    I don’t know why some bloggers feel the need to live for blogging. Yes, it’s an enjoyable experience, but Dollie Freeman is right; nobody should think our readers are waiting for our next post and think they’ll take drastic action upon us if we don’t deliver. It’s almost as if it’s a matter of life or death.

    Over the last few years, I’ve noticed a dramatic drop in weekend activity within the blogging world. I think some bloggers are getting the message, but it’s a shame when many good bloggers burn themselves out and disappear for good from our screens.

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  5. Though it goes without saying that your absence from the blogosphere is always keenly felt, Diana, I hope you are enjoying your break, and using the time to recharge creatively.

    I also set limits on my blogging out of necessity. My day is structured much like a college professor’s, with predesignated timeslots for e-mail, blogging, fiction writing, climate activism, eating, exercise, and even an hourlong “study hall” that I can use at my discretion (for catch-up work, or recreational reading, or to indulge a hobby, etc.). My fiction gets the lion’s share of my time — four deep-focus hours per day — and I allot only one hour for blogging, be it reading blog posts, generating content of my own, or replying to comments left on one of my posts. That’s it — one hour a day. Whatever doesn’t get done in that hour has to wait until tomorrow. (Same goes for my fiction: When my allotted time is up, I stop, even if I’m on a roll.)

    I love blogging, but like everything else, I have found that if I don’t set limits on it, I fall into a very counterproductive all-or-nothing rhythm whereby I spend an entire day (or even week) only focused on one task (writing or blogging or activism) at the expense of all the others. So, for me, it was about prioritizing my obligations, and then assigning a set amount of time to devote to each over the course of a single workday. That way, I relieve myself of the pressure of wondering if I’ll have time tomorrow for this, that, or the other thing, because the time has already been set aside for it.

    That said, stepping away from the daily grind now and then is absolutely essential, so I hope you are enjoying your vacation! We’ll be here when you get back!

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  6. Have fun, Diana. Sometimes we all need a break. Nice post. : )

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Great advice, it’ll be useful for when I find my way back to blogging, especially the breaks every so often!

    Enjoy your break, exploring volcanos sounds very exciting 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  8. […] The Benefits of a Blogging Break […]

    Liked by 1 person

  9. GREAT advice. Those who don’t blog don’t understand why we spend so much time on our blogs, and really even more time on the blogs of others. We’ve got FRIENDS out there in the blogosphere. We want to read their wonderful stories as well as their posts about their lives. We LEARN so much. And that makes us work even harder to produce good posts ourselves.
    But burn out is inevitable. Mine was getting serious, particularly since I have eye challenges when I’m on the screen too much. I made the difficult decision to post every other week. It’s a relief. But this also gives me more time to make sure I read as many blogs as I can during that two weeks. Then, once in a while longer blogging breaks. YES. I hope you’re enjoying yours. I’m sorry about your parents – you haven’t mentioned them much lately. This is an important time for you… and for them. I understand. ❤

    Liked by 1 person

    • Great comment, Pam, and I whole-heartedly agree. I’m sorry to hear that your eyes are giving you trouble. It’s a great example of how we each need to honor our individual needs and find what works. Our bloggy friends totally get it, so there’s nothing to lose. I’ve been thinking about how to change my blogging norms so that I have more time for blog friends as well as other parts of my life. Have a beautiful day, my friend, and see you in a couple weeks. Hugs.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Sometimes we need real life out there. Traveling or just a walk may be able to relieve saturation.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Sterling advice, Diana. Screens already take up so much of our lives, there is nothing wrong about taking a blogging break, or a break from any social media for that matter. Usually by the time you return, you’ve gained a fresh perspective.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. You know wat it is😘

    Liked by 1 person

  13. I try to look at blogging like a coffee break with friends. I read the blogs that interest me, answer comments, and then, I shut it down. I’ve started doing the same with all social media sites (my email alone has over 100 posts a day!), so I can concentrate on other interests- like reading 🙂
    Enjoy your time away, you’ve picked a beautiful season for it!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks for sharing that, Jacquie. I need to adjust my blogging choices a little. I think I probably spend way too much time visiting bloggers who’ve simply left drive-by likes. I’d would love to simply focus on those who take the time to commment and build relationships. 🙂 That’s the part of blogging that I love. See you in a couple weeks, my friend. Hugs.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. mistermuse says:

    Take care, Diana. Our first priority must always be to do what’s best for ourselves and our family. 😉

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Baydreamer says:

    This is wise advice, Diana. I’ve been blogging for a decade now and have taken several breaks. I turn off notifications from those who follow me which I feel really bad about. But seeing those emails pile up in my inbox just about gives me a heart attack. There is no way to catch up or stay caught up. I just do the best I can. I don’t feel bad about not posting anything, but I do feel bad about not reading what others share. I think we’re all in the same boat though and understand. At least, I hope so. If we grow bored with something, then it’s time to take a step back, then return feeling refreshed and excited to begin again.
    Enjoy your break. You don’t want your hubby looking like a sad puppy. Hugs!

    Liked by 2 people

    • I’m going on 9 years of blogging, Lauren, and I can count on one hand the breaks more than a week. But life changes and we need to be sensitive to that. I feel guilty about not visiting and not catching up too, but I’m going to let that go and just enjoy the time off. Yes, we’re all in the same boat! 😀 Thanks for the lovely comment, my friend. See you soon!

      Liked by 2 people

  16. AP2 says:

    Wonderful advice – and timely, thank you. Enjoy your break 🙏

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m glad the post resonated. I’m not very good at following my own advice (lol), but I try. I love blogging and don’t want it to seem like a chore, especially when my life seems a little chore-y lately. Have a lovely week and find opportunities to do what you love. ❤

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  17. Jan Sikes says:

    I love those tips for avoiding blogging burnout, Diana. Enjoy your reprieve!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Jan. I’m going to take a little break from everything and just breathe. I drew a rune after one of your recent posts, and the message was reversed… all about needing a reset. I’m going to do that. See you on the other side, my friend. ❤

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  18. Wishing you a wonderful break, Diana. Good tips in your post, thank you. ❤ Xxx

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Teri Polen says:

    Hope you have a wonderful, restful break, Diana!

    Liked by 1 person

  20. HI Diana, what you have said here makes sense. This is how I feel about work to be honest. I need a longer break than just a few days, I want to take 5 weeks over Dec/Jan because I am feeling very burned out with all the endless stress.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Staci Troilo says:

    I don’t visit weekend posts and don’t “catch up” with them, either. That has helped, but occasionally, I still need breaks. I feel guilty and disconnected at first, and I’m always happy when I return, but that recharging time is necessary to me on many levels.

    I hope you find the time off restores balance and peace. Best wishes to you and your family.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I love how disciplined you and Mae are, Staci. It’s good for me to see other bloggers honoring all aspects of their lives. I’m going to do some thinking about my blog/social media strategies while away too. And I know I’ll come back refreshed and ready to dive back in! See you on the other side. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  22. Hope the break helps, Diana. Thinking of you 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  23. acflory says:

    Good for you! Btw, there’s one more reason to take a break every now and then – absence makes the heart grow fonder. 😉

    Jokes aside, you have to love what you do. If blogging starts to feel like ‘work’, you’re burning out. Now, what volcanos and where??? Lots of pics please!

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Hello Diana,
    I agree with you wholeheartedly. I wish you a wonderful break, some moments to relax, and of course focus on your family and all the important things. Take care!
    Best wishes,
    Takami

    Liked by 1 person

  25. Rebecca Budd says:

    A wonderful reflection on life and creative balance. Have a wonderful blog break, Diana.

    Liked by 1 person

  26. petespringerauthor says:

    I share your sentiments, Diana. Our priority should be to our loved ones and ourselves. One or two day breaks just mean more work when we return. Everyone understands that we need these mental health breaks. We’ll still be here when you return.😎

    Liked by 1 person

    • Some people seem to be really good at taking small regular breaks, Pete, but I’m just not that disciplined. My husband and I are that age where we need to take advantage of the years we have left and go on some adventures (when circumstances allow). So we’re off! See you on the other side. 😀

      Liked by 1 person

  27. CarolCooks2 says:

    Wow, how awesome..visiting volcanos…Enjoy!…Great tips on taking a break which we all need at times …:) x

    Liked by 1 person

  28. Toni Pike says:

    How exciting to be visiting volcanoes – and what superb advice! Have a wonderful break. Toni x

    Liked by 1 person

  29. dgkaye says:

    Excellent tips Diana. And I used to ask all the same questions as I read blogs nightly for years. We all need breaks for various reasons, especially a mental break from blogging. And I find it rejuvenating to come back too. I plan on taking one in the coming weeks myself. Enjoy your time and your husband. ❤

    Liked by 1 person

  30. Jeff Flesch says:

    Have a wonderful break, Diana. See you on the other side. ☺️

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  31. Much hugs to you! Enjoy your break! 💖

    Liked by 1 person

  32. Diana, my best wishes to you and your parents. I know what it means to care. If you take a break every one will be here waiting for you.
    The advise is wonderful. Thank you for sharing 🌺🌸🌹

    Liked by 1 person

  33. J.D. says:

    You deserve a break, Diana. Enjoy.❤️

    Liked by 1 person

  34. Mae Clair says:

    I take a blogging break every November for NaNoWriMo. It’s so refreshing to concentrate on nothing but Homelife and writing. I barely log online at all during those blissful 30 days and love it.I also go offline every weekend from Friday afternoon to Sunday evening. I don’t try to catch up with the blogs I missed on the weekend. I just start fresh Monday and that works for me. We all need those breaks otherwise we’ll burn out.

    Liked by 3 people

    • I love your discipline, Mae. I just don’t have the flexibility with my folks who often need me at the drop of a hat. My schedule is unpredictable. I do hope that this break will be a good refresher so I can dive into Nano with a good attitude regardless of word count and general craziness. Thanks so much for the visit and have an awesome week. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  35. Have a nice break from it, Diana. You’re right about us all needing to catch our breath once in a while.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Anneli. I have less control and predictability in my day than I used to, and that means having to suddenly drop everything and run. I worry a little that I won’t be able to finish this vacation. But I gotta try. I can’t wait to catch my breath! Thanks for the lovely send off. ❤

      Liked by 2 people

  36. I just took three months, D. 🙂 and posted maybe 6 times. I’m starting up again, but slowly. One post per week. Have a great break. –Curt

    Liked by 2 people

    • I noticed your absence, Curt, and it’s fun to see you back. I’ll bet it felt good to ignore technology for a while, for the most part. Blogging is a fluid thing, thank goodness, and I’m glad you’re honoring other parts of your life. I plan to disappear for a couple of week and can’t wait. 🙂 Thanks for stopping by to say hello.

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