Tried and (Still) True: Book Review

Happy New Year.

It’s the time of year for resolutions. And what could be better than taking a few steps toward a happier, healthier, bountiful, and more compassionate life?

Four years ago, I read Erik Tyler’s book, The Best Advice so Far, and reviewed it here. Well, he has a second book out, and I was curious to see what new (or age-old) wisdom this author, mentor, and public-speaker has to offer. As expected, I gobbled it down in a matter of days.

My review is below, but I thought it would be fun to explore this author’s relationship with his advice. I gave him one question, and he was kind enough to reply.

The Question:

In my experience, Erik, sometimes in the process of writing, we aren’t only imparting information, but learning from it. I may be off the mark here, but I’m guessing that you have a favorite expression from your book, one that felt particularly personal or moving or insightful. Care to share what it is and how it’s changed you?

Eriks Reply:

Wow, that’s a tough one.

They all resonate with me personally for different reasons. But a stand-out for me would have to be “People who live in glass houses shouldn’t throw stones.” It’s never been so easy to not only criticize others but to do it publically. And this culture of negativity and ridicule weighs heavily on me.

I mean, we’re living in a strange time where even leaders at the highest level are having “Tweet storms” of petty hate and meanness on a daily basis. Empathy, compassion and respect take a real hit when we give in to this.

In the book, I talk about a tendency I had when I was younger to “people-watch” with friends in public places and to make critical comments about strangers. I included the strategies that helped break that habit. This was about “past me.” Yet as I continued to write this particular chapter, I noticed areas where I’d again allowed myself to pick up new stones in different areas.

It’s one of the great things about writing what I write: it keeps me honest. Being so aware of stones and my own glass house allowed me to once again reevaluate myself and make new choices for change. And that always opens my eyes and heart.

In fact, even in the nitty-gritty process of getting the e-book files for this book prepared, there was a stretch where I needed to interact with customer service people. It was stressful and tedious. And the easiest thing was to reach for those proverbial stones.

But having all of this fresh in my mind, I had this voice saying, “OK, are you going to take the easy route right now and be a hypocrite? Or are you going to put that stone down and treat people with kindness and respect, the way you write about, the way you’d want to be treated?”

So I’m definitely not just writing this stuff. I’m facing it daily, making choices about it myself, just as I hope any other person reading the book will be doing.

Diana‘s Review:

I enjoyed Tyler’s book The Best Advice So Far and looked forward to this new one, curious to see what wisdom this author, mentor, and public-speaker would produce. Tried and (Still) True is a reflection on proverbs of the past (one dating back to Socrates) that have stood the test of time: know thyself, haste makes waste, and a stitch in time saves nine, to name a few.

Most of us have heard these sayings before and know what they mean. But Tyler takes that meaning a step farther and gleans from each expression valuable lessons applicable to life in today’s world. The reader is presented with a deeper perspective, and most importantly, a way to practice that wisdom and become a kinder, happier, and more self-aware person. Who doesn’t need that in the divisive world we find ourselves?

Each chapter includes the history of the particular saying, most of them centuries old. In addition, each chapter ends with three questions for contemplation and a challenge that encourages readers to try something new—or try something old in a new way. The challenges are practice runs at changing our perceptions, getting unstuck, making satisfying choices, being empathetic, or grateful.

This isn’t a particularly short book, and yet I read it in days. Tyler’s writing is well-organized and well-edited, in addition to being peppered with personal anecdotes – most practical, some touching, and some laugh-out-loud hilarious. I found plenty of sensible advice conveyed in a way that I can apply it to my life. Highly recommended to readers of self-help books, and readers who want to learn to live a happier, healthier, bountiful, and more compassionate life.

Amazon Global Link: Tried and (Still) True is only $.99 through January 7th,

Erik’s Blog: The Best Advice So Far

 

178 thoughts on “Tried and (Still) True: Book Review

  1. […] Thanks so much to D. Wallace Peach for sharing this book on her blog. That’s how I learned about it. […]

    Liked by 1 person

  2. What a great review, Diana! I always enjoy learning where sayings come from, because sometimes it gives interesting insight on the time period when it originated. Good luck with the new release, Erik!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks for adding your thoughts, Julie. I enjoy how positive Erik is and how he shares these pieces of wisdom in an entertaining way. 🙂

      Like

    • Erik says:

      Hi, Julie! I agree: the history of language is fascinating. The great thing about these proverbs is the ability to see in them—through their history and glimpses into the lives of the people who brought them to us—that while culture and technology have changed, the core truths about life and humanity have not. They are still just as relevant today as they ever were. In fact, that is the entire point of the book.

      Liked by 2 people

  3. Teri Polen says:

    A perfect way to start the year, reading a wonderful book. Thanks for sharing, Diana, and best wishes to Erik with his book!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks, Teri. All this goodness from Erik last week and today my post is all tragedy! This is a fun book full of entertaining anecdotes. A great read. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • Erik says:

      It’s almost my hope when I write a book or blog post that people will feel that “new start” feeling. But even more, my goal is always to approach choice and change from a simple, memorable place where people will be able to stick with it. Based on 30+ years of mentoring, nearly 10 years of blogging and a couple books so far, it’s always my greatest feeling of accomplishment when someone tells me years after hearing me speak, or after reading a book or post, “I still remember what you said… and it’s changed the way I think and approach things.”

      So if you do pick it up, my hope is that it’ll start the year—and “from here”—off in a good way.

      Happy New Year!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. sandomina says:

    I stopped reading self-help books long ago, but this one seems interesting.
    Do read my latest article and share you views https://insightful.co.in/2020/01/05/a-war-is-coming/

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks so much for the visit. This isn’t your typical self-help book, but an interesting blend of history, anecdotes, and tidbits of wise advice that’s lasted the ages. 🙂 I learned a few things. Thanks for sharing your post. Have a great week!

      Liked by 1 person

  5. I have never read a self help book, Diana, but this does sound very interesting. I liked the analysis of that particular saying and I am going to try to take it to heart.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Erik says:

      Hi, Robbie. Thanks for sharing your thoughts. Honestly, when people ask me what kind of books I write, I still haven’t quite worked out an “elevator pitch,” because I always want to avoid saying “self help.” I just don’t like the term. It has a feeling that doesn’t capture what I do.

      I also don’t fit into “motivational” (which, for some reason, brings to mind images of Tony Robbins yelling) or “inspirational” (which makes me think about white robes, soft voices and doves flying). I know many people have different connotations than these, both as authors and readers, but I’ve always had trouble wanting to pair my writing with any of these terms.

      You remind me that I probably ought to think about that elevator pitch again!

      For now, I’m happy that you were able to take someone away even just from Diana’s kind post and our mini-interview. That’s the greatest gift to me as an author, to know that my words are encouraging more positive actions in the world.

      Liked by 2 people

    • I’m not a huge fan of self-help books either, Robbie, but Erik’s style is really fun, and the tidbits of wisdom are interesting as well as useful – good reminders for me, especially when I get so upset with the state of the world, and my dysfunctional country. Ugh. Thanks for the visit, my friend. 😀

      Liked by 2 people

  6. Sarah says:

    Happy New Year, Diana! ❤ And thanks for the book review, it sounds fantastic! What better way to start the year than with a good book. 😊

    Liked by 2 people

    • Erik says:

      It’s crazy to think that my li’l ol’ book may be the first book that some people read in 2020! And yet I feel confident that it will help those who read it feel encouraged and purposeful heading into this new year.

      Thanks for the kind words, Sarah. Have a terrific week!

      Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks for stopping by, Sarah. I agree. A new year with new books is right up my alley. This is a good one full of old wisdom and insights that still apply today. It was a hopeful way to start a year with so much turmoil happening around the world. *Sigh* Hope your new year is off to a wonderful start. ❤

      Liked by 2 people

  7. cath says:

    Happy New Year, Diana. Sounds like a very interesting book. I love proverbs, especially when if they’re accompanied by some explanations or history.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. I picked up a copy. So glad I found it in time for the special, and I hope it boosts to great visibility on Amazon. I interacted with Erik when I first met him through this blog. He comes across as a very caring and thoughtful person, down to earth and genuinely helpful. I’m excited to read this and be refreshed on the depth of these old saying that I’ve always been intrigued by and often guided by. Thanks for sharing it with us Diana!

    Liked by 2 people

  9. Jan Sikes says:

    Thank you for sharing this inspirational book, Diana, AND the author’s answer to your question. I love the idea of taking something old and making it new and relevant in daily life!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks for stopping by, Jan. There are a lot of good reminders in here for things that we know, as well as a few tips and different ways to look at challenges. And the book is fun and informal in style. Erik did a great job. Have a lovely new year, my friend, and Happy Reading and Writing!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Erik says:

      Hi, Jan. Funny thing is… this old wisdom has always been relevant in daily life. We’ve just sort of collectively “forgotten” it was here. Wanted to help us remember. I say this at the start of the book, but we’ve got more good information scrolling past our eyes minute by minute than ever before, and yet we’ve become conditioned not to spent any real time or thought or consideration on any of it.

      All that philosophical perspective aside… it’s also a fun book, full of stories of both then and now. I get messages, emails (and now, reviews) in equal proportion from people who welled up at a personal realization and road to change, and who laughed out loud in the middle of a crowded bus. So it’s not all ponderance. There’s plenty of playfulness as well.

      Thanks for reading and for sharing your thoughts!

      Liked by 1 person

  10. I’m a sucker for those old sayings. Wisdom in a time capsule, you know? And breathing new life into them sounds intriguing. Thanks for the post, D. Grabbed a copy today. Congrats, Erik (and love the cover)! Happy New Year to you both! Here’s to a joyful, peaceful year ahead. 🥂

    Liked by 2 people

    • Erik says:

      Thank you, Sarah. I had a lot of fun designing that cover and doing the layout inside to match. I remember when I made the last tweak and had that “Aha! This is it!” moment.

      As for the “wisdom in a time capsule,” I’ve explained it as “secret code” to some. It’s brilliant really: these highly memorable snippets that quickly convey a ton of valuable insight, information and guidance, and that are so easily memorized that you can build an arsenal of them almost without realizing you had. It seemed a shame that today’s society is losing them—losing out on them. So I wanted to do my part in bringing them back “for a new generation.”

      Much joy and peace to you in the year ahead. And I hope your read of TRIED & (Still) TRUE finds you at exactly the right time.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Gotta love an “aha” moment. 🙂 Kudos on the cover (and layout).

        And I do love the idea of a ton of insight in a tiny snippet. I’m a big fan of little works–micro fiction, flash fiction, quotes, poetry. Written well, they provide a punch with a small amount of words.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Erik says:

          While my books certainly have theme and flow/progression, I purposefully design them so that each chapter could also stand alone and complete a thought, along with reflection and action points. So I’m with you!

          Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks so much for visiting, Sarah, and for picking up a copy. It’s amazing how old and still relevant so many sayings are. Humans still need the reminders, apparently. Lol. Happy New Year to you too, my friend. ❤

      Liked by 2 people

  11. Mae Clair says:

    Wonderful! I really like the sound of this, especially combining the history of the saying with questions for current reflection. All the best to Erik, and thanks for the share. I want to check this one out in more detail on Amazon!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Erik says:

      Hi, Mae! It was certainly fascinating for me as the author to look at history from a very human standpoint—not so much about events or etymologies, but reconstructing the lives of the very real people who penned wise words when they were young and cool and following a dream—never for a moment imagining that their words would stick and still be discussed 500 years later. They were us. As such, some of what we are writing today may survive to teach future generations. It’s mind-boggling to me.

      I offered to one visitor here and I’ll offer to you now, if you want to check out the entire opening and first chapter, I pulled those into a specially-formatted document and put it up on my site. It should read pretty much like an e-book on tablet (though it’ll work fine from phone or laptop as well). You can get that HERE if you like. No hoops to jump through. No sign-up. I just wanted people to have a chance to get an entire chapter instead of the shorter “Look Inside,” so that you can see how each chapter comes around in the end.

      Thanks for the kind words and interest.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Mae Clair says:

        That’s awesome, thank you! And I do wonder what those people would think about their words becoming nuggets of wisdom for future generations!

        Liked by 2 people

        • Erik says:

          As do I, not only about writers and thinkers but artists and the like. I recall in the book my first trip to Paris and how I cried at seeing a Monet painting up close, not so much because it was especially amazing in and of itself, but because I wondered about the man, his blank canvas, his doubts… and whether he’d ever have guessed that his paintings would someday sell for over $80 million on auction!

          Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks so much for the visit and comment. I got some wonderful tips from the read as well as reinforcement for an attitude of kindness and thoughtfulness. Have fun over there at Amazon, and have a wonderful 2020!

      Liked by 2 people

  12. Anonymous says:

    Wonderful! I really like the sound of this, especially combining the history of the saying with questions for current reflection. All the best to Erik, and thanks for the share. I want to check this one out in more detail on Amazon!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Erik says:

      Hello! Thanks for taking the time to check the book out. I recommend reading some of the the early reviews. Many people who’ve taken the “Questions and A Challenge” section of each chapter to heart and done the experiments seem to have found new paths forward with them. I hope you’ll feel the same.

      And be assured: I took every one of the challenges myself first!

      Liked by 1 person

  13. Steven Baird says:

    Thank you for another thoughtful and insightful review, Diana. It’s always a treat to read other writer’s insights and experiences. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  14. Happy New year, Wallace! ❤

    Liked by 2 people

  15. dgkaye says:

    Thanks for bringing Erik and his books to our attention. I’m for all I’ve read here, so off to grab a copy! (Hope you get this, I’ve had an awful time trying to comment here, been bounced 3 times lol ) xxx

    Liked by 2 people

    • Erik says:

      Hi, Debby. Thanks for your comment (received!). Sorry to hear about all the bouncing around.

      I just peeked at your own catalog. Kudos! You’ve been busy! At a glance, they seem geared toward women. Which of your books would you most recommend for a general audience?

      Liked by 2 people

      • dgkaye says:

        Hi Erik. Funny you ask. When I began writing books I envisioned a female audience. Turned out quite a few males are interested too. I’m a nonfiction writer, and all my books are my truth. If this genre interests you, I would suggest – PS I Forgive you, my book on forgiveness for my narcissistic mother after she died – a forgiveness I couldn’t find while she lived. Or if you may be interested in how to keep a marriage (relationship) thriving despite all the crap life can put our way then perhaps I’d suggest my book Twenty Years: After ‘I do”. Thanks so much for asking. I look forward to reading your book! 🙂

        Liked by 2 people

      • Debby writes wonderful books, Erik. You’ll enjoy them. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

    • I got your comment, Debby! Phew. Sometimes WP gets glitchy and it’s frustrating. Thanks for trying again (and again). 🙂 I think you’re going to enjoy the read. Lots of good stuff in both books and I’m a fan. Have a wonderful Sunday and Happy Reading! ❤

      Liked by 2 people

  16. Great to get to know more about Erik and his books, Diana. I’m adding “Tried & Still True” to my kindle! 🙂 Happy New Year all around!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Erik says:

      Hi, Bette! First (knowing that I’m not pandering since you’ve already picked up the book!)… I love your profile picture. That is a smile the world could use more of! Honestly, whenever I’ve seen you pop up here on Diana’s site (and elsewhere?), I think the same thing: “She’s got such a bright smile!”

      I hope your reading of TRIED & (Still) TRUE is exactly what you need for “this place” in your life, whatever that may be.

      Happy New Year!

      Liked by 2 people

    • It’s not you “typical” self-help book, Bette. It’s more like a conversation with many touching and funny moments as Erik “swaps” stories with us. Lots of good stuff here. Thanks for the visit and Happy Reading!

      Liked by 2 people

      • Sounds like it will be right up my alley, Diana! ❤ xo

        Liked by 2 people

      • Cindy Hutchinson says:

        I’m going to keep it simple, if more people had Eriks mindset & compassion the world would be a better place; Unfortunately I believe this world has become so insensitive, it hurts my soul! Thank you Erik for your opened eyed lessons…..WRITE ON ✌

        Liked by 2 people

        • Thanks for the visit, Cindy. I too give in to anger and despair at times, but there are still so many positive, compassionate, and kind people making a difference. Yes, Erik is one of them. Keep spreading the love, it’s our greatest hope for the future. ❤

          Liked by 1 person

        • Erik says:

          Hi, Cindy! Thanks for popping over. You’ll enjoy it here. Diana is also one of those people who will remind you what’s right with the world.

          The world is a big place. I’ve found that if I focus on my world and the people there, and spread positivity and joy, it helps me not to be overwhelmed by those things I can’t control. I know you are doing the same!

          Liked by 1 person

  17. I particularly appreciate Erik’s comments on the old saying, people in glass houses shouldn’t throw stones.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Erik says:

      Hi, Liz. Having been thinking about this particular proverb from the book all day as I’ve chatted with people here, I’m having a new thought which I didn’t include in the chapter. I think the frequency and intensity of public “stonings” that we now observe through social media, celebrity gossip, etc. has most of us being conditioned to adjust our internal scales, such that throwing our own stones can feel more like throwing pebbles: “Well, compared to what’s going on in the world, my own stone-throwing tendencies aren’t really that bad.” How dangerous that is! It’s like saying, “Well, I didn’t kill her, I just roughed her up a little.”

      As I shared with Jacquie below, I think what helps me most not to adjust my scale is to not only “try not to throw stones” but to intentionally put good and kind and helpful words out into the world. This seems to balance things out in my heart and mind.

      Thanks for sharing!

      Liked by 2 people

    • Seems like the perfect proverb for the time, Liz, doesn’t it? The stones are flying everywhere, and it gets a little mind-boggling. 🙂 Thanks so much for the visit, my friend. Have a wonderful Sunday!

      Liked by 2 people

      • Thank you very much, Diana! I had a productive writing day yesterday.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Erik says:

          What are you writing currently, Liz?

          Liked by 2 people

          • I’m currently working on a short story inspired by my mother’s account of my birth (with strained family dynamics and a 1950s experiment in communal living thrown in).

            Liked by 2 people

            • Erik says:

              I learned so much about my own family history while writing this new book, and much of it is included to illustrate various proverbs. In fact, while vacationing with my mother, she was even recalling (at 75 years of age, no less!) exact phrases in Polish that her grandmother used to say to her. My mother doesn’t speak Polish, but I speak Russian. And her memory of these phrases she hasn’t heard in 70 years was perfect! I learned that my Grampa, who walked with a limp his whole life, had gotten broken his back in stopping a runaway train by jamming a large metal pipe into its wheels! It was all fascinating!

              Do let us know when and how we can read your own story, which sounds equally fascinating.

              Liked by 2 people

  18. I agree with the author; most people are guilty of casting stones. (Even us Canadians :))
    I was brought up on the premise, if you can’t say something nice, don’t say anything at all, and every time I’ve veered away from those teachings, there’s been a price to pay.
    Kindness forgives all sines- something we should all be working toward.
    Great review, Diana ❤

    Liked by 2 people

  19. Tessa Pulyer says:

    I love the expression “People in glass houses shouldn’t throw stones” and I use it often. Sounds like a wonderful book. Great review Diana!

    Liked by 2 people

  20. balroop2013 says:

    Thank you Diana for introducing this book to us, many of them go unnoticed. Old observations and sayings are relevant in all ages and interpreting them for the digital generation could convey some values ingrained in them. I agree with Erik – now we have “tweet storms” instead of stones and people’s behavior has remained the same for ages. They may say: “Don’t judge” but that is the first thing they do themselves. 🙂
    Wishing Eric all the best and a wonderful NewYear.

    Liked by 2 people

    • I think the “stones” of today can be even more damaging, Balroop, because we don’t have to throw them face-to-face. There’s a lot of wisdom in the book and I definitely enjoyed it. Thanks for the visit, my friend. Have a great weekend!

      Liked by 2 people

    • Erik says:

      Hi, Balroop! I want you to know, believe it or not, that you personally influenced this book, and really all of my writing. Years ago, I read a comment from you somewhere among our blogger friends that reminded bloggers and writers that their audience doesn’t just live in America but across the world. I’ve always remembered that! And it has been a consistent voice in my head when I’ve written anything since then. In the case of this book, I point out often that the wisdom that we’ve come to know through English proverbs most often existed in other languages and cultures well before they came to us. Likewise, my examples always keep in mind the scope of gender, ethnicity, culture, religion and more that may exist among my readers.

      So thank you for speaking up all those years ago!

      Liked by 3 people

      • balroop2013 says:

        Wow! Thanks for keeping me in your thoughts Eric. I do believe that people are the same…wherever they live, they share common beliefs and behavior. Whether it is kindness or jealousy, arrogance or racism, emotions or feelings, a slight difference is created by upbringing but the environment and the peer group also influence them. I have lived in the east and the west (now) and that’s what I have discerned. 🙂 Wishing you a wonderful year ahead and great success.

        Liked by 2 people

  21. This sounds like a book I would enjoy. Thanks for the introduction, Diana.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you for taking a look, Jill. I definitely enjoyed it. It’s down to earth, entertaining, and full of tips. I picked up a few practical ideas! Happy Weekend, my friend. ❤

      Liked by 1 person

    • Erik says:

      Hi, Jill. I don’t know why I’m saying this, or why particularly in response to you, but I’m going to go with my gut. One of the biggest encouragements I got was before the release, when my own mom read the book (which I dedicated to her, in honor of her 75th birthday and a lifetime of “mom-ness”). She texted me while I was away this past week:

      “Thanks so much for the pre-release copy of the book… in book form. I have already been able to read more than half of it during my quiet time in the mornings. I find myself forgetting that my son wrote the book and taking mental notes on where I stand or need to change areas of my life. Although being ‘long in the tooth’ myself and familiar with most of the sayings, I’m appreciating the expanded application and wisdom I’ve gleaned. I found myself laughing out loud while everyone else was sleeping this morning. In fact, I haven’t skimmed any part of it, for fear that I might miss a single, tiny pearl.”

      I know… moms are supposed to love everything their kids make, starting with clay hand prints and crayon scribbles to be posted on the fridge. But I cried a little, knowing that after all the wisdom my mom has passed my way, she got a little back from me all these years later.

      Liked by 2 people

  22. I really love to sit down with an inspiring book, at time it is just something we need to do to remind us of priorities. I enjoyed your review and the words of the author.

    Liked by 2 people

  23. officialosi says:

    I like the way you wrote this, but I’m not too sure on the book

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks for the visit regardless. I don’t read self-help books often but Erik does a wonderful job of bring the advice down to earth. And his anecdotes are a hoot. Have a great weekend!

      Liked by 2 people

    • Erik says:

      I’ll be honest as the author: there were times during writing it that even I wasn’t too sure on the book! (Happens to most authors at some point while writing every book.) Ha!

      If you’d like to take a chance on it, I pulled the whole opening and first chapter and put it in a document HERE. No strings. No sign-ups. I won’t who was there. I’m just up for the challenge of potentially winning over an initial skeptic. And I myself have read books that I felt “not too sure” about when given the opportunity to read a little without committing.

      Happy weekend!

      Liked by 2 people

      • officialosi says:

        I’ll defo give it a read. Thank you for being so honest about it, and have a nice day

        Liked by 2 people

        • Erik says:

          I’m impressed with your open-mindedness, officialosi. Can’t ask for more than that! I’m curious: are you yourself a writer? If so, what do you write?

          Liked by 1 person

          • officialosi says:

            I didn’t even see this, but I’m not a writer like you, I just blog lol

            Liked by 2 people

            • Erik says:

              Don’t downplay yourself. There is no “writer like you.” None of us is like anyone else. Perspective makes your writing something no one else can replicate. There are many kinds of writers. Emily Dickinson was a closet writer whose works weren’t even seen by another person until after she died. Some of the most moving writing I’ve seen has been thoughts expressed through graffiti in the Bahamas. I have friends who journal daily, even if only for their eyes alone. But they are writers nonetheless. Writers write. You are writing (a lot, I might add). So no, you’re not a writer “like me.” You’re a writer like you—which is exactly as it should be.

              Liked by 2 people

              • officialosi says:

                I meant that as in “I’m not a published author,” but I get what you’re saying. In terms of your book though I think it picked up towards the end when you were talking about knowing your strengths, and using them in your life.

                It’s very well written, it’s basically how I would talk (just more formally though lol), and I see you’ve added some “homework” at the end lol.

                I’ve only ever finished one “proper book,” in my life, and that’s only because I could envision myself doing what was in it (it was fiction), so I’m not much of a reader, and what I was expecting of a self help book was completely different to what you wrote because it’s almost like you were teaching through your own life, instead of making it all about the reader.

                OVERALL, the start was a bit slow for me, and I couldn’t really engage with it wholeheartedly, but I’ll defo keep in my mind what you were talking about towards the end.

                (And hopefully this made sense, I’m literally typing as I go)

                Liked by 2 people

                • Erik says:

                  Hey, you took my challenge! That says something. And not everyone loves reading. So doubly good on you. And despite the parts you didn’t connect as much with, you still found something in it. All of this tells me a lot about they type of person you are: someone willing to try new things, to learn and to better yourself.

                  Liked by 2 people

        • Erik says:

          Ahh, I see you have a blog. I wasn’t able to get there last I clicked on your avatar. I’ll check it out!

          Liked by 2 people

  24. Loved the post and review, and grabbed a copy! Too often, we search for “new” ways to deal with this life when the old ways work just fine. Will definitely share. Thanks and Happy New Year! 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  25. Good review and wise words from Eric in the interview. I laughed at the stress dealing with customer service. As an ‘older’ person, I like playing that card when dealing with those kinds of calls. I like being nice–act that way with them–and since I’m older, they don’t get tense with me over my questions and prodding. Nice change with age.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Ha, Jacqui. I don’t do the “old person” thing yet, but I do try to be kind. 🙂 I get more cooperation that way. I incorporated a lot of Erik’s advice from both books and the history was pretty interesting in this one. Happy Reading, my friend, and have a great weekend!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Erik says:

      Hi, Jacqui. Thanks for reading and for the kind words. Your own words here recall the subtitle of the book: “Old wisdom for a new generation.” One chapter in my first book, The Best Advice So Far, is entirely dedicated to the central idea that “Kindness still works.” I myself have definitely gained patience with age (just turned 50!); but as a lifelong mentor to youth and young adults, I try to impart the learned skills and attitudes of patience and kindness to others as soon as possible. Our world needs it!

      Liked by 1 person

  26. philipparees says:

    I have been in hibernation for far too long Diana, but my NY resolve it to reconnect with a few very good friends. I never meant to but obsessional writing took over! So you are first and I stopped by to wish you Happy New Year Diana. Thanks for this heads up and straight ahead injection!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Writing obsession isn’t a bad thing, Philippa. I was so glad to see your name pop up, though, and I’m delighted to be your first stop! Ha ha. Wishing you a marvelous, happy, healthy, and bountiful new year, my friend. ❤

      Liked by 1 person

    • Erik says:

      Happy New Year, Philippa! Not so long ago, I was right where you are: in hibernation as for connecting with my blog-community friends and writing on my own blog, for the sake of writing this very book. We all have our cycles. (And, for me, it’s always both difficult and wonderful to re-engage with the blogging community.) So take it at your own pace. The first chapter of this book centers on the proverb “Know thyself.” And I’ve found that to be key as a writer, in being OK with the ebb and flow of engagement with “the outside world.”

      Liked by 1 person

      • philipparees says:

        And to you Erik! Writing a memoir is certainly a ‘know yourself’ or perhaps rediscover what you thought you knew is not the whole story exercise! In the writing what emerged were whole new dimensions!

        Liked by 2 people

        • Erik says:

          Don’t you love when that happens (after it settles, that is)?

          Do let us know when the book is released!

          Liked by 1 person

          • philipparees says:

            Now THAT is a kind request Erik! Trying to decide whether to seek a publisher or be even braver and put out another ‘unlikely to find readers’ masterpiece! Once can always fool oneself with the latter! From Diana’s review you will not have that problem. It is so long since I last published I can hardly remember how I did it.

            Liked by 2 people

            • Erik says:

              “Like riding a bike,” as they say. Don’t let anything hold you back! Just go a little further with it each day than you did the day before and you’ll get wherever “there” is supposed to be.

              Liked by 1 person

  27. This sounds like a very enjoyable book.

    I really liked his very well thought response to your question. He didn’t just do a “A stitch in time really resonated with me. And that’s all I gotta say about that.” His response was very thoughtful and thought-provoking.

    Liked by 2 people

  28. V.M.Sang says:

    This sounds an excellent book. One that probably everyone in the world should read, looking at the way the world is going. Thank you for bringing it to our attention.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Thanks for taking a peek. My biggest learn from this one was how to keep my house clean with less effort (stitch in nine). Ha ha. Very practical! But it has a lot of wisdom about kindness and happiness too. Have a great weekend and a wonderful new year!

      Liked by 2 people

    • Erik says:

      Thanks for taking time to comment, V.M. We’re definitely in unprecedented times. And yet I’ve come to the conclusion that as far as “the way the world is going,” I am part of that “world.” I work hard to continually let go of what I cannot control, and to put my energy into what I know I can control as a part of that world. One of those things is writing things that will encourage people, give them back their sense of personal choice, and motivated us all to keep focusing on what we can change rather than what we cannot.

      Liked by 1 person

  29. This sounds like an interesting book and approach to teaching/ advising. I like Erik’s attitude toward living his advice.

    Liked by 2 people

  30. Damyanti Biswas says:

    Sounds like a balanced book. Thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks for stopping by, Damyanti. People don’t change much it seems and the wisdom of hundreds of years ago is just as relevant today. It was a great read on a number of levels. Have an awesome day. 😀

      Liked by 1 person

    • Erik says:

      Thanks for taking the time to read and comment, Damyanti. I did intentionally strive for balance. And feedback from early readers across a wide range of ages, genders, locations, etc. has been positive; so it appears that the balance I was hoping for was achieved. Have a great day!

      Liked by 1 person

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