Fragrant #Writephoto

Copyright Sue Vincent

Agatha inherited her grandmother’s home, a small thing as houses went, with creaky floors and spidery cracks, a kitchen with two hundred years of updates and none of them modern. The place smelled of beeswax and herbs, lemon polish, patchouli, and memories.

She loved the quaint place that would become her home, but it was the formal garden that she roamed first. The Garden of Good Intentions, a little hand-painted sign said at the start of the nearest path. Neatly edged walkways, lined with bright fireworks of lavender, divided the round garden into quarters like slices of pie. All well-tended. But it was the myriad roses that had soaked up her grandmother’s devotion—old garden heirlooms and hybrid teas, exotics and wild species, miniatures and clusters of grandifloras.

The garden had once filled Agatha’s childhood with magic, but now as she strolled the pathways, her eyes widened with dread. She was born with a withering, wilting, aphid-prone, black-spotted thumb. In a year, the cherished garden would be dead.

Despite its impending doom, the place was worth an effort at least. Lips pressed between her teeth, Agatha rummaged in the shed for clippers and gloves and donned her grandmother’s straw hat with plastic daisies wired to the brim.

She watered too much when she wasn’t watering too little, cut away dying canes and broke a few living ones, deadheaded, and made her own fertilizers and bug sprays that scarcely worked. In the autumn, she trimmed the bushes back so far that she figured a few would never see spring. And yet somehow, they always recovered after a year… or two, heavy with blooms, vibrant, and smelling like heaven.

Jocelyn inherited her grandmother’s home with its creaky floors and spidery cracks, and though the kitchen had been updated, the place still smelled of honey and herbs, lemon polish and memories. She loved the quaint place that would become her home, but it was the beautiful garden that she roamed first. The Garden of Good Intentions, a hand-painted sign said at the start of the nearest path.

**

This story is in response to Sue Vincent’s #Writephoto prompt. Sue shares a new prompt every Thursday.

100 thoughts on “Fragrant #Writephoto

  1. afrenchnote says:

    This is a story filled with fresh green herbs. Reminded me of grandma’s and mum’s kitchen. They were old kitchens too, if only I could turn back time! Thank you Diana, it was a fabulous story. I enjoyed reading it.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Wonderful story, Diana. With good intentions everything is possible. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  3. rijanjks says:

    What a scent-filled magical story!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Vashti Q says:

    Hello Diana! What a beautiful story. I wish I had a garden of good intentions. I too was born with a withering, wilting, aphid-prone, black-spotted thumb. :/

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Sarah says:

    I just picked up one of Agatha Christie’s novels so my mind went instantly to her and English gardens as well. 😊 And what a beautiful little story you concocted out of such lovely fragrances! My nose could smell it more and longs for summer – not only because it’s cold at the tip! 😉
    A very heartwarming story too it is. A garden that’s always taken care of through the generations – a beautiful image to behold. ❤

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you for the lovely comment, Sarah. I love the scents that elicit memories and tie us to to places and people. Summer will be here soon and we can have our noses in flowers and honey. 🙂 I’m so glad you enjoyed the story. Have a wonderful day.

      Liked by 2 people

  6. Lake Writer says:

    Beautifully written, and it gives me hope for my own black thumb.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Beautiful story 🙂 I’m in love with the name ‘The Garden of Good Intentions’!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Love this, Diana! A nice glimpse of gardens when the snow is flying outside. And love the scent imagery! Reminds me of how much smells can stir up memories. ❤

    Liked by 2 people

  9. You brought the beauty to life.

    Liked by 2 people

  10. Teri Polen says:

    I loved the imagery in this, Diana – also felt like I was reading about myself, lol.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. I love your description of the poor woman who doesn’t have green thumbs (like me), Diana.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Annika Perry says:

    On a grey day you transported me to this heavenly garden, full of summer garden fragrances, sights and sounds! Wonderful piece and touching how it has remained within the family for generations!

    Liked by 1 person

  13. You have such a way of transporting a reader with your writing.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. What a delightful story. I almost missed the name change (sigh).

    Liked by 1 person

  15. acraftymix says:

    OMW, you have the most incredible way with words. I swear I could smell the beeswax and patchouli, and the walk through the garden was magikal ❤ Loved the images you conjured up in my head. So beautiful.

    Liked by 1 person

  16. balroop2013 says:

    A lovely tale that emphasizes Mother Nature’s role in our lives, generation after generation…fragrance remains the same!

    Liked by 2 people

  17. Oh, I love this.

    And “a kitchen with two hundred years of updates and none of them modern” sadly, describes my own.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Beautifully described marvellous legacy

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Adele Marie says:

    Beautiful story. xxx

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Beautiful! Magical also. The place seems steeped in it. Has to be right for the poor brown thumbs to do their worst and yet have the garden thrive? Or maybe it’s just because they’re living up to the legacy of good intentions 😉

    I love the description of the lavender – fireworks. So apt.

    A truly lovely piece 🤗

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Saring says:

    Was that magical? I may be in a state between sleep and wakefulness but is Jocelyn roaming that garden and Agatha too like parallel universe or magical realms or she Agatha’s grand daughter and in a different time for she did not smell Patchouli? Beautiful, awesome writing, descriptive in every senses I could see the colours the vibrancy the overgrown weeds, smell the lemon grass and abhor the horrible hat with plastic flowers.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I love your interpretation! 🙂 I wasn’t going with magic, though magic is a part of many of my stories. Just the passage of time. The scents have changed a bit with the passing of generations, but so much continues, intentionally and simply because it’s what is familiar and part of our legacy, passed on from grandmothers to granddaughters who become grandmothers. I love the circles of life. Thanks so much for the wonderful comment. Have a great week!

      Liked by 1 person

  22. memadtwo says:

    A fragrant circle of life…well, what could be better? (K)

    Liked by 2 people

  23. I enjoyed how Agatha started out dreading the care of the garden (not to mention that presumably that it came into her possession from her grandmother’s gentle passing), but despite a few mistakes and learning opportunities, the garden bloomed. It speaks of hope for generations to come, may there always be a garden for us to tend and may our mistakes allow us to recover from them. You have woven many great life lessons in this and it was a joy to read. Thank you!

    Liked by 2 people

  24. Smiling… Beautiful story of tangible and intangible value! ❤

    Liked by 1 person

  25. mistermuse says:

    Reminds me of a wonderful 1949 movie called THE SECRET GARDEN starring Margaret O’Brien.

    Liked by 2 people

  26. Wonderful piece, Diana!

    Liked by 2 people

  27. Steven Baird says:

    Lovely writing, Diana. It brought to mind my grandmother’s home from many years ago.

    Liked by 2 people

  28. Silent Hour says:

    A garden as a heirloom is an excellent idea, and so is it’s name. Your piece brought flowers and beautiful smells into this winter day!

    Liked by 2 people

  29. betulerbasi says:

    I love the fact you become the character as you read through this story. Such detail and depth!

    Liked by 2 people

  30. I love this – on so many levels!

    Liked by 1 person

  31. The generational connectivity in this piece is so beautiful. Even the mere choice of names – like Agatha and Jocelyn – hints at what eras these people are working in. I enjoyed imagining this as a stately home, perhaps in Britain, with gardens that are often nowadays in ill repair. Such a kind, lilting tale!

    Liked by 3 people

    • Thank you so much for the kind comment. The prompt made me think of English gardens and I’m delighted that you picked up on the names. 🙂 Yay. My grandmother was a beautiful gardener, and I have a black thumb, but I do try! And roses seem very forgiving. Happy Writing! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  32. Sue Vincent says:

    That smells like every grandmother’s home… and I love the cyclical continuity of the inheritance.

    Liked by 1 person

  33. Lovely story Diana.
    I worry if ever I’m given a house plant as a gift as it never sees another year.

    Liked by 1 person

  34. Very sweet. We all need a garden where our good intentions flourish.

    Liked by 2 people

  35. Jordy says:

    I love this, Diana! Such great attention to detail,
    and poor Agatha’s aphid ridden black thumb!
    Loved filled generations and gardens bloom. Heartwarming!

    Liked by 3 people

  36. Beautiful! Magical! The Garden of Good Intentions. “The place smelled of beeswax and herbs, lemon polish, patchouli, and memories.” How I love this sentence!

    Liked by 4 people

  37. Sadje says:

    Interesting. History will repeat itself?

    Liked by 1 person

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