Jumping Genres

I’m delighted to be over at Julie’s today with a short and somewhat silly post about “Jumping Genres”… what possessed me, after years of writing for adults, to write a book for children. I hope it brings a smile. πŸ˜€

Facets of a Muse

Please welcome my good blogging friend, D. Wallace Peach. Besides having a wonderful blog where she shares poetry, short prose from writing prompts, and peeks into visits with her grandson, she’s a prolific fantasy/sci-fi author. Since she writes for the adult market, I wondered why she chose to write a children’s book, so I invited her to stop by and shed some light on the subject. Take it away, Diana!

Available in Print: USA, UK, Canada, India

Julie asked me what possessed a writer of adult fantasy and sci-fi books to suddenly write and illustrate a children’s book.

The answer isn’t quite straight-forward, but it’s not that complicated either. I never set out with a children’s book in mind, but sometimes the ingredients come together and it’s a matter of timing more than intent.

The main reason is Tornado Boy.

Tornado Boy is 4 years old…

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64 thoughts on “Jumping Genres

  1. I can easily imagine you writing in many different genres, Diana. Clicking over. Hugs!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. bpsenapati says:

    Congregation Diana for your new book.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Nice post! I agree, many authors are writing for a variety of audiences nowadays, it’s all good!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. With full acknowledgement to the importance of a consistent brand, an artist has to be led by her own impulses, inspirations, and instincts; if that means “jumping genres,” so be it. Besides which, a consistent worldview will emerge in anything an author writes. Take Max Brooks, who wrote one of the defining zombie novels of this century, World War Z, and just recently published a novel for middle-graders based on the Minecraft videogame! And yet both explore the same theme: preparedness and resilience in the face of mortal danger. A genre isn’t a brand; the brand is you.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Great comment, Sean. Neil Gaiman is another fantasy writer who writes children’s books and does so quite successfully. I don’t see this as a complete shift but as a leg of the octopus (spider?). πŸ™‚ A few more legs to grow before I’m done.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Yes, excellent point about Gaiman. What makes him successful is that he is a master of his craft, draws from varied influences (not just other fantasy novels), has a unique point of view, and follows his creative instincts. I can’t say whether there’s a “formula” for success, but that’s certainly not a bad blueprint!

        Liked by 1 person

  5. I loved this book! I think you are so amazing and talented, Diana. I’m still in awe that you are also an illustrator. Tornado Boy will treasure this book throughout the years.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. We’re ‘ambi-writers,’ Diana. We can flow from one genre to another. Plus, of course, we have the extra incentives like Tornado Boy and the Wild Ones (my guy and I dump all of our grandsons into one category). :-0

    Liked by 2 people

    • Ambi-writers! Good word for it. So far I have stuck with fantasy, just a different age group and nicer monsters. πŸ™‚ You really jump genres, Pam. It definitely is fun doing something creative in a different way. Happy Writing!

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Hey! Welcome to the children’s book author club!

    Liked by 2 people

  8. Chantal says:

    I love “the ingredients come to together…more timing than intent.” I think the best intentions often never come to fruition, and timing has a way of opening doors we might not have seen. Great words.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Wow, you are so versatile! I’ve tried writing other things besides satire, but no matter how hard I try, it still comes out as me being a smarty pants, so I’ve just embraced it.

    Liked by 2 people

  10. dgkaye says:

    Fantastic post Diana. I’m sure many wonder how you jumped genres. Tornado boy explains it! πŸ™‚ Great photo too of the little author. ❀

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Yes. Getting out to craft fairs with my book. Four more in the next couple of weeks. They are lots of fun. 😊

    Liked by 2 people

  12. It looks like a beautiful book Diana. Perfect for Christmas presents. 🌼

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Congratulations, Diana. Sounds wonderful. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 2 people

  14. This looks very good

    Liked by 1 person

  15. It must be wonderful to have a grandchild! I’m sure I’ll love it someday, too.

    Keep reading my story, please. And I accept feedback!

    Would you consider recommending my blog/book to your readers/followers?

    Have a great November! XX

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks so much for stopping by to read, and I’ll be over soon to keep reading. I have trouble keeping up with serials on blogs but have enjoyed your writing when I catch a chapter. Feel free to stop by and engage with my followers. I know many of them will reciprocate. πŸ™‚ Happy Writing!

      Liked by 1 person

  16. hsampson says:

    Congrats D!! You are full of surprises!!! This is brilliant!!!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Hector. Might as well start thinking about the power of a positive attitude at an early age. πŸ™‚ I’m so glad you enjoyed the post. Have a great day, my friend.

      Like

      • hsampson says:

        Definitely it is extremely important! Children are little sponges that absorb everything around then, including fears and frustrations from the adults. I am so happy that you are sharing your Light with the little ones. Thank you D!

        Liked by 1 person

  17. arlene says:

    That photo of the boy is simply lovely πŸ™‚

    Liked by 2 people

  18. Steven Baird says:

    Congratulations, Diana!

    Liked by 2 people

  19. davidprosser says:

    Cleverly done Diana, no wonder Revel appreciates the ‘pictures’.
    xxx Massive Hugs xxx

    Liked by 2 people

  20. mycountryepoque says:

    Diana I enjoyed each and every words. Thank you for allowing us the joy of reading. You are one in a million!

    Liked by 2 people

  21. […] via Jumping Genres β€” Myths of the Mirror […]

    Liked by 1 person

  22. I have a tornado, a twister and a hurricane. not grandkids. they don’t share my fascination with the written word. I loved that part about ‘like a literary agent, he was unimpressed’. i love those kids with a wide and wild imagination. you’re a lucky grammy.

    Liked by 2 people

  23. Anonymous says:

    How neat that you paint, too! I love your illustrations.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Mae Clair says:

    My copy came in the mail yesterday. I had to browse through it before setting it aside as a Christmas gift for my grand niece. You are so talented!

    Liked by 1 person

  25. Who is not wild about D Wallace Peach! Totally fabulous. Thanks for the text, enjoyed.

    Liked by 3 people

  26. It was great having you over at my place, Diana! This is such a fun post πŸ˜€

    Liked by 3 people

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