Fallen Angel

click on the image to enlarge for a view of the being in the shadows

This is a result of an early morning dream as I let my mind wander in search of a new book idea.

Feathers rustle softly in the corner of my room. The sound is subtle, intentional. He’s broken through more than the walls of my home; he’s defied the barriers dividing our kinds. He perches like a wraith in the safety of his shadows, waiting for me to wake, to stir at his presence. I don’t twitch.

On ebony nights, when woolen clouds swath the mountains and blank out the moon, the world turns invisible and senses heighten. My room smells of snow and wood fire, and his breath whispers. I’m his echo, and if I could see, my slow inhales and exhales would blow the ashes of old choices into the still air and shroud my bed in a coverlet of regrets.

My eyes search the shadows for an outline, a face, a reprieve. A phantom light glimmers on the black rachis and vanes of his wings. This fallen angel has traveled between worlds for me, only to find I’ve lost my wings along the way and can’t go home.

170 thoughts on “Fallen Angel

  1. superwifeandmummy says:

    Wow. Simultaneously warm and chilling

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Diana, the beauty of your prose always impresses me, but this one leaves me breathless. I resonate deeply with the lost wings and inability to go home. Beautifully done. Mega hugs.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Interesting stuff. I have a few dream stories, too, but so far they’ve only been fragments like this, nothing that turns into anything substantial. Maybe this will be one of the dream stories with staying power. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • I think in this case it’s partly timing that may pull this one along. With the tetralogy done, I’m ready for a new story idea. I’m working on an outline now but not committed yet. Thanks for stopping by and reading, Cathleen. Happy Writing!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Bernadette says:

    Thanks Diana for taking the time to post at the Senior Salon. I hope that you will develop this into a story. It would be mesmerizing.

    Liked by 2 people

  5. sudershana says:

    Very beautifully crafted.
    Will glad to have you at my site too

    Liked by 1 person

  6. This is incredibly lovely, Diana.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Dewin Nefol says:

    Hey Diana,

    I adored this elegant, eloquent and figurative foray into the liminal space between realms. It is a rare gift indeed to be blessed with such ‘vision’. The imagery is excellent the pace perfect, and the tension you establish between snow and fire is superb: my mind turned readily to stories such as Frankenstein and the interplay of passion and purity, sweet innocence and yearning for grand adventure.

    Have you really lost your wings Diana?

    May I leave you a link to an article I read recently discussing the liminal and the imaginal. I found it fascinating and hope you will as well.

    https://anelegantmystery.wordpress.com/2017/03/05/vision-from-the-under-other-world/

    Thank you for a delightful read. Hoping all is well in all ways.

    Namaste 🙂

    DN

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks so much for the lovely comment and the link, Dewin. I’ll be over for a look! I’m uncertain where this piece will go, or how the story somewhere in here will change it, but the creative process is fun. Thanks again for the visit! Namaste. ❤

      Liked by 1 person

      • Dewin Nefol says:

        Hey Diana,

        My pleasure. A thoroughly enjoyed piece of excellent writing. I too am fascinated to know where your intriguing tale will go…your uncertainty simply adds an additional layer of mystery to what has already been revealed and has us all waiting breathless for more….

        I trust the link proved of some use? There is much to be harnessed from this site.

        Hoping, if you celebrate, your Easter Weekend will bring blessings and inspiration by way of Love and chocolate.

        Namaste ❤

        DN

        Liked by 1 person

  8. Helen Jones says:

    This is beautiful, Diana – some gorgeous imagery in your words. Will it go any further, do you think?

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Erik says:

    Diana: “Oh my, I’m soooo ready for a clean break from writing after finishing this four-book serial. I’m going to relax, read, garden, spend some time with hubby and … wait, hold the phone, a new story is brewing.”

    Jot. But please stick to your summer plan of refilling the tank, no matter how the sirens sing their song. 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

  10. ❤ the poetic flow in your prose, just beautiful. ❤

    Liked by 2 people

  11. Heartafire says:

    Gorgeous writing Diane, filled with ethereal images and wonderful metaphor! 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  12. Definitely onto the right thing here

    Liked by 2 people

  13. bpsenapati says:

    Great, sometimes I also see some vivid dreams, most of I forgot. The way you describe it likes to see a movie. . .

    Liked by 2 people

    • I forget most of them too, Bibhuti. Years ago, I kept a dream journal, but it was so hard to get up in the middle of the night and jot them down! Think of all the inspiration we are missing. 😀 Happy Writing!

      Liked by 2 people

      • Erik says:

        Before the days of iPhones, I kept a voice recorder by my bedside, in case I should have a sudden burst of songwriting or other inspiration in the night. Three times, I woke to found that the recording number had advanced and listened to myself singing songs I’d written but don’t remember having recorded or even imagined. Our minds are curious things.

        Liked by 2 people

  14. adeleulnais says:

    Oh wow, I really loved this, the imagery was beautiful. xx

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks, Nathalie. I remember so few of my dreams and sometimes I could kick myself for not writing them down in the middle of the night. This one was vivid, and I remembered the whole thing in the morning. Perhaps a longer story in here. We’ll see. 😀

      Liked by 2 people

  15. Beautiful. The fallen Angel. 😍

    Liked by 2 people

  16. dgkaye says:

    Just popped by to look at the image again. I saw the black wings and a man’s face. So cool! 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  17. reocochran says:

    Diana, this had so much going on in just a small space! I like the idea of this spark which could ignite an entire book or series! Keep on going, may it grow and live. 🙂
    I have had phrasing and words come to me before, usually in the middle of the night, not at all ready to awaken. So, I write using my finger to guide it along a perpendicular positioned edge. I once had a murder mystery pour out of me on lined notebook paper, almost all in one month. When it came to the end, my Mom squelched it, saying this has happened before on a television series. Hmmm.

    Liked by 3 people

    • I’m glad you can relate, Robin. I’ve written notes in the dark too, hoping I can decipher them in the morning! Did you know that there are truly a very limited number of plots? Writers change details, characters, time frames, settings, nudge them here and there to make them unique, but still at the core they are archetypal stories. Do you still have your murder mystery? It would be fun to resurrect if you’re inclined! 😀

      Liked by 2 people

      • Erik says:

        I agree, Diana. How many times has Romeo and Juliet been told in different ways. But was Brokeback Mountain a worthless rehash, for instance? I think not. It takes immense creativity and daring to offer a time-worn plot in a new light.

        Liked by 2 people

    • Erik says:

      Reminds me of a girl I liked in high school. I’d poured myself into the first song I’d ever written her. I recorded it on a cassette tape and gave it to her with a letter. She didn’t say anything for a few days, so I asked if she’d listened to it, to which she replied, “yeah. It kind of sounds like something I’ve heard on the radio.”

      If everyone held back from what their mom’s or other well-meaning (or not) people offered by way of opinion, most noteworthy works would never see the light of day. Forge your own path, Robin.

      (And to this day, having listened to an awful lot of music across a lifetime and with plenty of distance for objectivity, I’ve actually never heard another song that sounded like that one I wrote for the girl way back when.)

      Liked by 2 people

  18. Erika Beebe says:

    Beautiful passage and wow, what a dream. I love the “coverlet of regrets”

    Liked by 2 people

  19. Cecilia says:

    This sounds so amazing! Books coming out of dreams are always great, aren’t they.

    Liked by 2 people

  20. I love this too, Diana. Will this be a supernatural novel?

    Liked by 2 people

  21. Juana says:

    Reblogged this on Silver Slipper Revolution and commented:
    It’s been a while since I read blogs. I love this post by D. Wallace Peach.

    I’ve decided to combine my two blogs and transfer my writing blog here, as well, so watch for a site overhaul this year. I’ll still write on social justice topics, but I wanted to add a couple more ingredients for some freshness.

    Liked by 2 people

  22. Wow, that’s a great bit, Diana. I could see this being the seed for a short story, or novella. Or, heck, go all out and do a whole novel. I always find it interesting when dreams have multiple layers as this one seems to. Enjoy the rest of your week 😀

    Liked by 2 people

  23. I love everything about it, besides the feathers. That’s too biblical to me, but I am agnostic, so my opinion might be irrelevant.

    Follow the path, many will read it. Follow your instinct.

    My friend and neighbor, who is battling stage IV pancreatic cancer, told me that she felt a dark presence in her bedroom right before she got diagnosed. She said she saw something dark standing at her bed.

    I suppose we see what we fear or hope for?

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks, Bridget. I don’t “feel” this character as bad, more lonely – a choice to “fall” to find the woman who has lost her wings, so perhaps an act of love. I’m so sorry for your friend’s illness and all the fear that comes with it. I wish her much love and light. ❤

      Liked by 1 person

    • Erik says:

      If it helps to know, Bridget, while some biblical beings are described as having wings, none mention feathers (well, other than actual birds). And none really look like what art depicts as “angels” (which really just means a messenger of any sort, supernatural or otherwise). There are some pretty odd looking critters within the pages, and most that fly have more than two wings (as many as sixteen, in fact, and with multiple faces as well).

      Not that this changes your agnostic stand, but perhaps it will allow you not to cringe quite so badly at the feathers.

      Liked by 3 people

      • I grew up in the Catholic church, spent 13 years in a boarding school with nuns in Europe. Paitings and famous art about angels include wings, that’s a must have for angels and for the believer.
        As for the bible…don’t get me started. I love fairy tales

        Liked by 3 people

        • It seems you two share some less than delightful memories of religious training. I’ll leave it at that, except to say I like who you’ve both become ❤

          Liked by 1 person

          • I have fond memories of my time in boarding school and will always speak highly of my teachers -including nuns. Many of us students became either nonbelievers or are agnostic, like me. I wonder why 🙂

            Liked by 1 person

            • I remember at least one of your posts about boarding school, Bridget. I think it was one of the first posts of yours that I read. You wouldn’t be who you are today without having been who you were then. 🙂

              Like

        • Erik says:

          I agree with you that most art does depict the feathered wings. In fact, curious story, along the way, church people I’ve known have at times “found angel feathers” while praying, allegedly as a token that God was there. And I’d always ask the same questions:

          1. “Why are they so tiny?”
          2. “Are you willing to have it tested by an ornithologist?”
          3. “Are you open to the idea that there are feathers all over the place from down pillows, clothing, birds, etc. and that you just happened to be hyper-aware of them right now because of the book you just read about how people at that West Coast church are now finding feathers?”

          Somehow, I was always labeled a heretic. But then again, so was Galileo. 😉

          Boy, European boarding school or an Independent Fundamentalist Baptist school. How nice to have our own lives and choices now!

          Liked by 3 people

      • So interesting that art has in some ways altered our understanding, at least visually, of the bible. A fascinating scholarly topic of which I know just about nothing. 🙂

        Liked by 2 people

  24. Steven Baird says:

    Wow, Diana. This is really intriguing, and I hope you consider continuing it. I’ve been fascinated with the dream world my whole life and it’s an enormous source of imagination. There’s a terrific story here waiting to be explored. 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

    • I hope so, Steven. I had a spark months ago about a story about divided world and the ability/inability to cross over and irreversible choices…etc. Then this dream was so vivid. I am letting it float around 🙂 You are doing some amazing writing yourself!

      Liked by 4 people

      • Steven Baird says:

        It sounds like it’s got great potential, something to really chew on. Vivid dreams like really open up an entirely different landscape/feeling that are so easy to lose in the day-to-day, but if they stick around, I think that means it’s something you should explore. And I hope you do. 🙂

        Liked by 3 people

  25. A.S. Akkalon says:

    Powerful stuff!

    Liked by 2 people

  26. Joanne Sisco says:

    Your writing tends to take me somewhere that leaves a sense of yearning. What is sadder than an angel who’s lost his wings and can’t go home?
    I love the line “if I could see, my slow inhales and exhales would blow the ashes of old choices into the still air and shroud my bed in a coverlet of regrets”.

    Liked by 3 people

  27. That is thought-provoking. I’m going to have to think about it.

    Liked by 3 people

  28. This is a reminder that I need to learn to think a little more lyrically on occasion — to dream a little rather than always taking such a methodical approach to storytelling. Our minds have wonderful treasures waiting to be unlocked, but those are accessed through metaphysical channels, not always intellectual ones.

    Liked by 2 people

    • You have to be able to sleep in, Sean, to catch the best dream time. And write them down quick! If this becomes a story, the methodology will eventually take over, but it’s great to start with a sense of emotion and character, secrets to their story that I need to uncover. I’d like this to go somewhere. We’ll see. 🙂 Happy Writing and have a great week!

      Liked by 2 people

    • Erik says:

      A writer can have an incredible plot, interesting characters and the ability to describe in detail — and still have a work that falls flat for lack of soul, the poetry of prose that in itself moves the reader beyond what the imagery alone can achieve.

      Liked by 2 people

  29. Diana, your brain does not rest, even when sleeping 🙂 Dreams are incredible….
    This already got me going, and I wanted to read more. Happy dreaming and Happy writing, looking forward to more 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    • I do a lot of writing in my sleep, Lynne. You’re right, it doesn’t turn off! Sometimes the scenes are so real and I’ll work on them over a few nights (while sleeping). Then wake up and feel disoriented that none of it is written down anywhere! Ha ha. Thanks for the visit and have a great week!

      Liked by 1 person

  30. I can see the angel in the photograph on my large monitor. I think you do have the seeds of a couple of characters and a storyline. I was very captivated and wanted to read more of the snippet!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks, Kathryn 🙂 I’m toying with ideas and this little scene showed up. Usually I have a story waiting in the wings, and it’s kind of fun have possibilities floating around a bit for a change. Thanks for visiting, my friend. Have a great week. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  31. dgkaye says:

    Wow Diana. You have a wonderful muse who gifts you with such fantastic ideas. I’m already captivated, especially since I’m about all things angels. And PS, boo, the photo doesn’t show. ❤

    Liked by 2 people

  32. Beautiful writing. Wow, dreaming about angels!

    Liked by 2 people

  33. Definitely an intriguing start to this. You should pursue this.

    Liked by 2 people

  34. Beautiful writing, D! 👍

    Liked by 2 people

  35. balroop2013 says:

    This is brilliant Diana, poetry and prose weaved into each other and I love that Angel in your room; his symbolic presence is breathing subtle messages. Loved reading this little story, may be inspired from dream but is close to reality 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks for the lovely comment, Balroop. I’ve been musing lately about the idea of angels, other realms, the nature of “the fall,” and whether that was an act of banishment or curiosity or both, depending. There may be a story in here. This was a cool dream. Have a great week and happy writing, my friend. 🙂

      Liked by 3 people

      • Erik says:

        I seem to recall that you have a degree in theology, Diana. So you may be aware that even the bible has many “falls” mentioned. One seems to involve a joint plot against God. One involves “the sons of God coupling with the daughters of men” (and, it would seem, resulting in the race of “giants” known as the nephilim from which Goliath is said to have hailed). And another involves something unmentioned that resulted in a group who were immediately “chained in the abyss.” So you’re on good ground to find story from your dream.

        Liked by 1 person

        • My degree is in Pastoral Counseling, which is really different. It focused on listening, exploraton, and supporting clients in finding peace with their human life in light of the harsher aspects of their religious beliefs (any faith). I worked mostly with people who were dying or who had lost someone close.

          My actual religious training and knowledge is just about nil. I’m going to have to do a bit of research, if only to gather more ideas. I like the idea of “falling” as a misnomer, and that the fallen angels actually chose to leave, because they wanted to experience “the other,” the poignant human ordeal of an imperfect and finite life. Perhaps to better understand the eternal life of spirit. (Or something like that.) ❤

          Liked by 1 person

  36. You have dreams like this ??? Wow, D. Somehow…I’m not surprised !!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Ha ha. I do! I’ve been “writing” in my sleep/dream state lately. The trouble is, I usually forget them. I need to keep a flashlight, pen and paper by the bed. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      • Yes, you surely do..this stuff is golden !

        Liked by 1 person

      • Erik says:

        All of my dreams are vivid. And while they may make stellar stories, the scary ones are either so terrifying that I don’t know if I’d be able to live them over and over enough to get them into written form.

        Some from decades back still haunt me.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Fortunately, I don’t have nightmares, other than “having to do a presentation and never having read the material,” etc. I can’t imagine how awful night terrors would be, and I can imagine that they might stick when they feel so real. 😦

          Liked by 1 person

          • Erik says:

            I suppose it’s just how my brain is wired. My good dreams are equally vivid and complex. In fact, across a lifetime, I’ve even had recurring (I would say regular) dreams about people and places, where I’ve picked up with them exactly where I left off. They know I live in this … life … and ask about it, and we catch up on what they’ve been up to. It’s all very real.

            I even had a “best friend” named Devin who existed in dreams. We lived in a neighborhood that only changed as normal things happened like new people moving in, stores changing owners, etc. It was on a steep hill that led to the ocean.

            Those dreams ended. Then decades later (somewhat recently), I wound up in that old neighborhood again. It had changed quite a bit. Some houses were gone, having been replaced by stores. And a few of the usual shops down by the beach were boarded up. I saw a man coming out of Devin’s house. It was his older brother Gavin (who was always in the dreams). He was 40-something. He met me halfway. I asked him about Devin, and he told me that Devin had not done so well since I “left” those many years ago. Then I saw Devin exit the house, looking very old, overweight and sad. But when he saw me, he lit up. I gave him a hug and told him I had tried and tried to get back for many years but couldn’t. He wasn’t angry, just sad. He understood.

            I woke up sobbing. Fascinating … but also terrible stuff.

            Liked by 1 person

  37. This is so deep and very poetic. I always enjoy reading your blog cause I learn a lot and you’re always driving me to a different world because of your deep thoughts. This is really well written and I can truly feel what are you trying to convey. You’re always been the best writer Diana.

    Liked by 2 people

  38. Captivating, Diana. 🙂 — Suzanne

    Liked by 3 people

  39. The V Pub says:

    You’ve piqued my interest with this idea, Diana. I like the idea of fallen angels. I don’t know if you’d be interested, but there’s a book called From the Ashes of Angels that tries to find the origins of these angels, mostly taken from the Book of Enoch. It may give you some ideas on who’s who in the zoo. 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

  40. Morgan says:

    I love the description of this piece, the longing and loneliness. Its a story that sounds familiar and I cannot help think of my own Dark Fey, but I love how he’s waiting, regardless 😉 Just lovely, really. Not dark at all.

    Liked by 2 people

  41. Beautifully written. 😊

    Liked by 2 people

  42. It’s good, as is the picture.

    Liked by 2 people

  43. Bernadette says:

    Looks like you are on to something good here.

    Liked by 2 people

  44. So lovely, Diana. He is there for a reason! 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

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