Featured Blogger: D. Wallace Peach

I had the great honor of being the Featured Blogger for October on Rob Goldstein’s blog: Art by Rob Goldstein. His is a wonderful eclectic blog full of art, photography, poetry, writing, mental health education and awareness, social responsibility, and blogger support and kindness. If you haven’t run across Robert’s blog, here’s your chance. On to the interview….

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My Featured blogger for October is author D. Wallace Peach from Myths of the Mirror. Before we begin, thank you for accepting my invitation.

Thanks so much for inviting me, Robert. I’m honored to be chatting on your blog.

Tell us a little about yourself, where you’re from and how that affects your point of view?

Great question as I do think our roots inform who we are. I come from a family that spent its free time in the forest. My parents used to drop my younger brothers and me off at a trailhead in the Green Mountains and pick us up 4 days later, 25 miles down the road. Sort of “Hansel and Gretel” except we carried maps. The first time we hiked without adults, I was about 11 years old and my youngest brother would have been 7. We were fearless and adventurous kids. Sometimes the raccoons got into our food or we got stuck in a snowstorm, but we survived. Those are some of the best memories of my life, and they had nothing to do with “things.”

I was also raised by left-wing liberals, and though I labored in business for 18 years, I hated the focus on money. After 9/11, I started working as a volunteer with grieving children, quit my job, and returned to school for a counseling degree, which I loved. Today, as an author, my fantasy books reflect an appreciation for a simple life, nature, and the human pathos that arises from choices: fear, greed, power, compassion, sacrifice, and love.

You mention that your profile that as a child you preferred television to reading until you read the Hobbit by Tolkien. What was it about the Hobbit changed your life?

Reading was b..o..r..i..n..g until I turned 13 and…

(Continue Reading: Featured Blogger: D. Wallace Peach)

68 thoughts on “Featured Blogger: D. Wallace Peach

  1. literaryeyes says:

    We lived past the county line in Sarasota, Florida, with a ranch behind our house and a citrus grove down the street. All the rest was woods and a few homes. My brother and I and the other kids spent all day outdoors, often out of sight of our parents. It was wonderful! I suppose parents would be afraid to do that now, but maybe they shouldn’t be. Popular media has made us more wary. I rode a train from Newark to Winter Park alone when I was about twelve. It was a great experience and I’ve loved riding trains ever since. I’ve made that trip as an adult many times, and I carry that first sense of adventure and self-sufficiency with me. As for being a late-blooming writer, I know what you mean. Learning to navigate social media takes some thought. The writing comes easily to me, but I am increasingly impatient with editing.

    Liked by 2 people

    • I think times have changed, Mary, you’re right about that. That all day, unsupervised outdoor exploration and imagination doesn’t happen much anymore. I wasn’t nearly so free with my kids. I still feel like a social media newbie and giving blogging advice felt strange 🙂 Happy Writing!

      Like

  2. What a great interview, Diane. So good to get to know you some more.

    Liked by 3 people

  3. Ali Isaac says:

    Your parents abandoned you for 4 days in the wild? With a 7 year old in tow? In snowstorms? Was this a regular occurrance? I’m all for teaching kids independence and self reliance, but wow! What a way to do it. Hopping over to check the rest out now… 😁

    Liked by 2 people

    • Yes, they did, multiple times. We grew up that way, so it didn’t seem odd at all, Ali. The snow was a fluke, and the raccoons only wiped us out once. A wandering forest ranger gave us a box of macaroni & cheese, and we still had the food in cans :-). I have lots of stories of our time in the woods, and fortunately, none of them frightening. (My mother admitted, years later, that she worried, but I’m glad she didn’t stop us.) Thanks for reading! Happy Sunday.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. dgkaye says:

    Fantastic interview Diana. It was lovely getting to know more about you. It’s no doubt that your childhood spent going in the forest was a lead off to your imaginative stories for your books. And nice to see we’re on the same page about the importance of sharing on social media. 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

  5. Wow! What a childhood! I don’t think I could have coped doing that when I was 11. To be honest I’m in my 30s and I think I’d have trouble with it.

    Liked by 3 people

    • We grew up that way, Lisa, so it was an average day. Put us in a city and we would have been stressed! It was fun thinking about how my early life affected the themes in my stories. It makes all of our books different and fascinating to read 🙂 Thanks for the visit!

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  6. reocochran says:

    Rob, great questions and Diana, fabulous childhood details!
    This helps me to relate better to you and understand better your other worlds you create! I was the oldest and we did have plenty of adventures, my two younger brothers and I were 3 Musketeers, swinging from trees, dragging a ladder, wood and nails into the woods. We would go hours building forts or wading in creek’s. It wasn’t nearly as bold as being left for days since we would run back into the house for bathroom or food.
    I think the fact my friends and I were allowed at age 12 to ride a bus to Cleveland International airport to catch a Rapid Transit to downtown the Terminal Tower, is an equally exciting adventure, though! My friends say they cannot believe we were allowed to “disappear” as young children all day in summer and as middle schoolers, take off for downtown Cleveland! 🙂
    I Love your books and hope to get them as a set for Christmas from my one grown child who has an account for buying online items.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks so much for the comment, Robin. It sounds like we’ve had similar adventures. The hammer and nails reminds me of my own efforts to turn the old chicken coop into a club house 🙂 How fun to head to Cleveland on you own with your friends. Times have changed, huh? Have a wonderful weekend, my friend ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Oh this is marvelous, Diana. I’m glad you shared it with us here. I enjoy Rob’s artwork and blog. Hugs

    Liked by 3 people

  8. Steven Baird says:

    Another wonderful interview, Diana. It’s always a pleasure to learn more though your characters and the writer behind them. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  9. confabler says:

    Your pic is beautiful💞
    The childhood adventures and trecks of yours through the forest sound like a fairy tale. I wish I had done something like this when I was younger.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thank you. I had some great adventures as a kid and luck seemed to be with us. Our numerous trips to the hospital were for the things we did when we were home in civilization. 🙂 I had plenty of adventures as an adult and plan to have more. It’s never too late! Go for it. ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  10. I really enjoyed learning about your background, Diana! Where are the Green Mountains? I can’t imagine dropping off children like that in the woods these days. We’d get arrested for child endangerment, lol!

    Liked by 2 people

  11. […] Wallace Peach’s blog post today https://mythsofthemirror.com/2016/10/07/featured-blogger-d-wallace-peach/ inspires me to repost this piece I wrote some years […]

    Liked by 3 people

  12. Wonderful interview and thank you for sharing pieces of your life’s journey.

    Liked by 3 people

  13. Great interview, great questions. I cannot imagine parents leaving their young children off in the mountains to fend for themselves for 4 days!!
    Great that you and your brothers actually loved the adventures. So glad it created the author in you 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

  14. jessealynxc says:

    How beautiful and inspiring that was. For someone who is making a similar career change and pursuing the same passion, that was exactly what I needed to read today. Thank you for being you and sharing with us.

    Liked by 3 people

  15. Fantastic, Diana. It was wonderful to learn about your adventures. I’ll head over to share the post everywhere! 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

  16. Kev says:

    Nice one, Diana… Well done! 😊

    Liked by 2 people

  17. parparvan says:

    Once again an incredible journey! I look forward to following your blog 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  18. Christy B says:

    Absolutely wonderful! I left my comment over at Robert’s blog 😉

    Liked by 2 people

  19. What an amazing story–about hiking with your 7-year old brother. Why not? If you know how to survive–and don’t run into a problem. It must have worked out! What an education.

    Liked by 3 people

    • Thanks for reading, Jacqui. I did more risky hiking/climbing as an adult, but for the most part I knew what I was doing 🙂 I’m a little too old now for the more daring adventures, but no regrets. 🙂

      Like

  20. Great interview! Look at you, becoming a celebrated blogger on top of a great author. You’ve come such a long way since your first timid steps on WordPress 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  21. What a unique interview, Diana and Robert. I’ve definitely learned some new and very interesting things about you, Diana.

    Liked by 2 people

  22. Joanne Sisco says:

    A great interview Diana. I share your view that the world is full of magic. Just because we can’t see it, it doesn’t mean it isn’t there.
    Anyone who spends time in nature sees the end result of magic!

    I’m still digesting the part about you and your siblings being left to hike out of the forest 25 miles (!!) on your own. Wow! A very different childhood which I’m sure made you very resilient.

    Liked by 2 people

    • My parents used to drop us off on a river with a canoe (without life perservers) and tell us they’d pick us up in a few days under a bridge downriver. It seemed perfectly normal to us, and yet I would never have done that with my kids, ever. These days the parents would be arrested. Times change but I’m so glad I had those opportunities as a kid. Thanks for reading, Joanne 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  23. Hello Diana,
    Wow, this must be an interesting journey to be featured in others blog. I didn’t know that you were raised up in the piles. No wonder you’re very positive in almost all aspects in life, your articles have been a benefit to most of your readers. You have moved us because of owning a heart of truly inspiring others.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks for the sweet comment. I’m glad you enjoyed it. I do try to remain positive, Ariel, and if that’s what others take away from my blog, I’m delighted. Thanks for the visit, my friend.

      Like

  24. quotesandmore says:

    It was good to know more about you 🙂 Have a great weekend 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

  25. Love the interview, Diana! So fun to learn more about you 😀

    Liked by 2 people

  26. Jennie says:

    Wonderful interview!

    Liked by 3 people

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