Garden of Light

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My work-in-progress takes place in a world where nature is sentient. Living light dwells in every stone, blade of grass, and forest of moss-strewn trees. Light circulates through the blood and marrow of the animals and natives who inhabit the planet’s green fringe. Called luminescence, it manifests most clearly in water, visible to the eye in rivers of purling color and a brilliant sea.

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This past weekend for my “no-computer” day, I drove to Seattle to enjoy my first opera. Though separated from my laptop, I’m a retriever fixated on a tennis ball; I can’t disengage from my stories. I keep my eyes peeled for morsels of experience and inspiration to feed my tales.

The opera didn’t fill the void, but we had a few hours to wander before the show. We visited the ChihulyΒ Garden and Glass exhibit. The front of the guidebook has this quote from Dale Chihuly:

“I want people to be overwhelmed with light and color in a way they have never experienced.”

Hmm, coincidence or the universe at play?

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I walked away inspired. In my book, I plan to add a scene where a main character (a planetary interloper) partakes in a native ritual. He imbibes a herb, and in an altered state, he perceives the luminescence that flows through and binds all life in a garden of light. The beauty of the glass world was inspiring. How can I resist?

I share my photos – every element is made of handcrafted glass.

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If you ever visit Seattle, visit the Chihuly Garden and Glass Exhibit and be inspired…

106 thoughts on “Garden of Light

  1. My Bean says:

    This is amazing! Thank you, I am in love with the color media.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. joannesisco says:

    Every photo I’ve ever seen of Chihuly glass is a wonder and yours are no exception. To be mentally engrossed with your story of luminescence and walk into a Chihuly exhibit is serendipitous indeed πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Sacha Black says:

    Woooooooooooooooooooooooweeeeeeee

    They look bloody amazing oh man I wish I could visit that exhibition. I think I would have loved the vibrancy and intricate details.

    Your story sounds interesting. And like you I can never switch off not really, not once I’m embedded in a story!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. dgkaye says:

    We are never far away from our work Diana, that’s a fact. Well maybe the Opera was a bust, but how gorgeous these photos are! πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Khaya Ronkainen says:

    Wow! Beautiful creation.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Annika Perry says:

    What a wondrous exhibit, Diana! I’m not surprised you found inspiration and brilliant you can use it in your writing. πŸ˜€ perfect – it wil be a magical scene.xx ps. What was the opera? Any good?

    Liked by 1 person

    • The Marriage of Figaro, Annika. It was my first opera, so I’m not an expert on the artform. I did get a little sleepy at a couple points, but then it was past my bedtime too πŸ™‚ Or maybe the alcohol (LOL) The glass garden was the highlight of the adventure, for sure.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Those are absolutely beautiful! I had some hand blown glass roses once, until my daughter knocked them over. It is interesting how colors and imagery fuel our imagination. Great post πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Widdershins says:

    Very otherworldly. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  9. reocochran says:

    We have Chihuly glass in Columbus at two locations: Franklin Park Conservatory and the Columbus Art Museum. I loved your photographs, Diana! πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  10. C.E.Robinson says:

    Fascinating photos! Inspiring! Will visit the museum on my next trip to Seattle. Can see your character light up! πŸ’› Elizabeth

    Liked by 1 person

    • It’s worth the ticket price. My pictures only show what was in one room of many, and there’s a whole outdoor garden that’s lit up at night. I do hope you get to see it some day πŸ™‚ Thanks so much for the visit and comment!

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Oh my goodness, these are absolutely stunning pieces. I hope I get to visit the museum one day! Your sentience idea sounds like a good one. Very intriguing.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Isn’t it cool? The pictures don’t do it justice and this was only one room in the building πŸ™‚ Though Seattle has the largest exhibition, Chihuly has 50 installations around the world. Maybe there’s one near by! Thanks so much for visiting, Jane.

      Like

  12. Absolutely inspiring! I once saw this kind of work while visiting the Bellagio in Las Vegas. This is something you definitely have to see in person to really appreciate the intricacy of this art work.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Thumbup says:

    Gorgeous pictures!

    Liked by 1 person

  14. How absolutely stunning! I can only imagine how amazing it must be in person. I’ll have to remember the Chihuly Garden and Glass exhibit next time I’m in Seattle. Wow!

    Liked by 1 person

  15. One of the greatest things about living in the Northwest! Tons of art EVERYWHERE!!! Next time you come up, you should see the Glass Museum in Tacoma. They are badass. http://www.cmog.org/glassmaking/studio?gclid=Cj0KEQiAz5y1BRDZ4Z_K_eGa84cBEiQAtQkeaHKk6TiiZnhGtoL08llJ9KFls1jUoObWN8ffa4NompwaAj1V8P8HAQ

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Carrie Rubin says:

    I have family in Seattle, but I didn’t know about the Chihuly Garden and Glass exhibit. I’ll definitely look into it next time I’m there. Looks gorgeous.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Harmony says:

    Beautiful pictures! Enticing description of your new book! Can’t wait to read it!

    Liked by 1 person

  18. Purpleanais says:

    Beautiful photographs

    Liked by 1 person

  19. babbitman says:

    Visually stunning – and I’m very interested in your current project – can’t wait!
    As a very logical bugger, I can confirm that the quote was a coincidence… But I LOVE coincidences because they show that, out of an infinite number of things, we get TUNED to spot particular patterns. When, as a teenager, I bought the paperback book of The Hitch-hikers Guide To The Galaxy on a whim, I was astonished to find out, that same evening, that it was being serialised on TV the following week. Not weird forces at work (Douglas wouldn’t stand for them) but just me being tuned to spot any reference to HHGG. And maybe I had subconsciously been primed to buy the book because of increased discussion in the media which, up until I was attuned to it, I hadn’t really noticed. All of which I think makes our perception of coincidences totally fascinating.
    Your idea of a bit of a ‘trip’ for the main character reminds me of a short sci-fi story I read ages ago (apologies, I can’t remember who wrote it). In it, a human discusses with an alien why the alien doesn’t like music. It turns out the alien perceives things on a richer level than humans and so our best orchestrations are bland and disappointing. The human then experiences the alien’s ‘music’ via drugs and electrodes (I think) and has the best trip imaginable. But when it wears off he finds himself in a dull, monochrome world of no fun: the alien experience had burnt out his senses and nothing could give him pleasure again.
    So let that be a lesson to you! Just say no to weird alien drugs!
    πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  20. davidprosser says:

    Fabulous work, it glows.
    xxx Gigantic Hugs xxx

    Liked by 1 person

  21. balroop2013 says:

    Hi Diana,
    This pictorial treat reminds me of Corning Museum of Glass, which we had visited when my daughter was doing her residency in Buffalo…what sweet memories…of Niagara…nature at its best and fascinating man made trees of glass! I felt I was in a new world!
    Nature has undoubtedly inspired us in more than one ways and continues to add new dimensions to our personalities.
    Thank you so much for an inspiring post. Loved those pictures. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Balroop. The exhibit in Buffalo sounds wonderful. Trees of glass. I’m going to hop over and look up the website. The Chihuly words definitely felt alien. I was transported. Thanks for the visit. Have a great day, my friend.

      Like

  22. Trippy! I love your imagination and the way your brain works. As for the fixation with our stories thing, I, too, suffer from it. Whenever I’m not working on my stories in one way or another, a little voice in the back of my head is whispering, “now, we could be doing something much more fun than this now, couldn’t we?” πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  23. What a beautiful collection. Thanks for sharing. Light and glass…always fascinates. ☺

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Love your writing and descriptions as always! We are going for spring break and I have never been there, will have to go!

    Liked by 1 person

  25. Reminds me of Sanderson’s The Stormlight Archive, where he created a world where plants move and react to things. It’s a fantasy book, but the world felt more like an alien world than fantasy world.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I haven’t read The Stormlight Archive yet, but I enjoy Sanderson’s work. I don’t read series until they’re complete (Martin and Rothfuss killed me with their imcomplete stories)! The exhibit reminded me a bit of the movie Avatar with the glowing plant life. It was beautiful.

      Liked by 1 person

      • babbitman says:

        Ah, I’m glad that I’m not the only one thinking of Avatar after seeing your pics & reading your text! πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

        • It was Avatar-ish. It made me wonder if James Cameron had just visited one of the Chihuly exhibits πŸ™‚ My world goes further with the sentient aspects, the planet taking an active role in shaping the future. I’m halfway done (2 of 4 books) so there’s still wiggle-room in how it will all play out. πŸ™‚

          Liked by 2 people

  26. What a treat for the senses πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  27. I think my back garden is sentient. If you ever need inspiration fetch your snippers and try to cut it down.
    And like the others said that’s stunning.

    Liked by 2 people

  28. Nurse Kelly says:

    Oh Diana, I am such a fan of Chihuly’s glass! I have seen two exhibits, and really want to visit the museum out where you are. I have many ornaments and pieces of blown glass in my home – something that has always fascinated me. How lucky you are to live so close to Seattle! My husband was there recently and fell in love with the city. I’ve never been, but we’re planning a trip soon and visiting the museum is at the top of my list. Can clearly tell how filled with inspiration you are from your words and ideas in this beautiful post!

    Liked by 1 person

    • It’s the largest of his exhibits in the world because his studio is out here. There’s a whole outdoor area that is lit up at night where the glass is intermingled with real plants. If you make it to Seattle, Kelly, it’s a must see πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      • Nurse Kelly says:

        I’ve seen photos online of the gardens and lights – must be spectacular in person. Will make it there someday – hopefully sooner rather than later! Gorgeous post – hope you have a lovely day πŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

  29. noelleg44 says:

    Another imaginative concept, Diana. And the glass works are truly inspiring. I’m looking forward to a great story…if I walked on the grass would it yell ouch, ouch? πŸ˜‰

    Liked by 1 person

    • Ha ha, Noelle. My planet is organic with consciousness expressed as living light. I don’t think I’ll tackle anything as complex as a glass planet. There’s a great children’s story in your idea, though. πŸ™‚ πŸ™‚

      Like

  30. Celia Reaves says:

    Gorgeous! I can see how these spectacular creations would inspire your work. Thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks for the visit, Celia. There was a whole room of sea formations, but my photos didn’t do it justice. And there’s an outdoor exhibit where the glass is intermingled with real plants and trees. It’s supposed to be spectacular at night when it’s lit up. I’m a fan πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  31. The V-Pub says:

    I don’t believe in coincidence. The universe was at work to inspire you, Diana, and what inspiration it was! So alien looking, yet beautiful.

    Liked by 1 person

  32. K'lee L. says:

    Stunning work, Diana and an interesting conncept to what’s sure to be a great story.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks for the visit, K’lee. I’ve always been fascinated with light, and I tend to gravitate toward images and artwork that capture it in nature. I actually do believe that we have a limited view of planetary wisdom, so my fantasy is only a bit of a reach. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      • philipparees says:

        I am not sure it is a ‘reach’ at all! We just have to wait until Mankind loses his arrogant belief that sentience appertains only to him, or is a product of the brain. Plants wither when an intention to cut them down is focused and repeated, water retains the impression of what it encounters ( or is submerged in it) in its droplet crystals. We have not yet begun to see consciousness in all its manifestations. Looks like being an important book!

        Liked by 1 person

        • I completely agree, Philippa. I’ve witnessed the impact of emotional energy on plants and seen the amazing results of music and emotion on water crystals. My book is alien fantasy and it won’t be illuminating (forgive the pun) in any profound way, but I hope it will be an entertaining read. πŸ™‚ Thanks so much for the visit. Happy Writing.

          Like

      • K'lee L. says:

        I’m of the same mindset when it comes to light. Dawn light in particular has always fascinated me. I’m eternally grateful to have been a child surrounded by amazing nature. I feel like I’m only now understanding its importance in my artwork. I wonder sometimes if as humans, we’re not meant to see nature at her truest source? The few ‘masters’ who have walked this earth excluded. of course!

        Liked by 1 person

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