Burrower’s Moon

pixabay free image, skeeze

pixabay free image, skeeze

In my fantasy world, the full face of the Burrower’s Moon heralds the coldest days of winter. Fronds of ice feather the windows, and the snow crunches and squeaks. Fire licks the sooty stones of the hearth while candles burn low. We sleep in our socks and drink tea to warm our bones.

Here in Oregon, the Burrower’s Moon lights the sky just after midnight, during the wee hours of January 24th. We haven’t any snow, but in my books, the whiteΒ is deep and cold.

pixabay free image, stocksnap

pixabay free image, stocksnap

Excerpt from The Burrower’s Moon, Eye of Blind

Lying beside Gallard, Starling felt the tenderness she’d carried all day. She thought of the Endellion and the finality of terror they faced while she lay sheltered in a landscape beautiful in its rawness, her World full of possibility. She was struck by the contrast, starkly rendered for all to see if they would only look. A contrast pitting life against death, connection against separation, compassion against brutality, vision against blindness, caring against indifference. She could go on and on and on as if the differences were so absolute there remained not a scrap of common ground for them to reach across. Yet that was illusion; there existed no air at all between hunter and hunted and the wilderness they inhabited. That alone felt so terribly heartbreaking.

credit background: pixabayΒ free image by carolinda

86 thoughts on “Burrower’s Moon

  1. cmblackwood says:

    Very powerful, especially with the perfect winter images. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  2. reocochran says:

    This is so beautifully expressed. I like how you name the moon “Burrowers” for all the groundhogs, squirrels, chipmunks and possums. . . Humans, too, I imagine! πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Ali Isaac says:

    Such beautiful writing. I really enjoyed that excerpt. Although I have to say, Burrowers Moon is one I haven’t heard of.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Very beautiful and we had a “burrowers moon” last night in New Mexico. I’ve never heard that term before and I like it. We had a surprise snow storm yesterday, with huge goose-down flakes, that blew out in a rosy, sundown. The moon and stars were intense and gave a breath taking reveal of the new fallen snow. If I could, I would have gone out for a walk but instead, I gazed at it from my window. I’m sure I’ll be expounding upon it.:0)

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I see you wrote it is mild and sunny there. I’m in the squeaky snow you describe right now. Bundled up and drinking my roasted barley tea as I catch up on my favorite blogs! πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Annika Perry says:

    Diana, it’s always a joy to read the extracts from your books; lyrical and full of mysticism. Just like the new background to your blog – I love it. No snow for us either at the moment, rather a warm 13 degrees centigrade – yesterday the birds thought Spring had arrived!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Sacha Black says:

    Barely a sprinkling here in the UK – actually I’m near London I think there has been in the north but nothing I suspect like the US. Lovely excerpt too πŸ’–

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Great post, Diana! Every time I see the news reports about snow in the “south” (is KY really ‘the south’?), I can’t help but wonder how paralyzed (or NOT) we’d be here in MN. We’ve been lucky so far this year, with little snow. So glad the storm missed us!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. newvideos31 says:

    Selam hello priviet merhaba gerçekten fantastik siteme beklerim lütfen beni ziyaret edin

    Liked by 1 person

  10. kimwrtr says:

    12 inches of snow here in the NC Mountains and still snowing or blowing off the top of the nearest mountain. It’s hard to know here in the valley (soup bowl) sometimes. It’s true movement is pretty much stopped here when there’s a lot of snow. Not only panic mode but also lack the resources that most northern states have. I prefer to hunker down in the house with a good book or writer work during this type of weather. What am I saying? That’s what I normally do on the weekends anyway.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. This piece takes me back to northeastern Ohio and those bone-chilling winters. I used to wait for the school bus outside and stamp the ground to keep my feet a bit warmer. Hope you’re keeping warm. My daughter in Brooklyn hadn’t seen the storm when I last texted her. My son in NC is probably in the middle of it there. People there panic when heavy snow comes as they don’t get it often. Good piece, Diana. πŸ™‚ — Suzanne

    Liked by 1 person

    • You made me smile, Suzanne. I lived in Vermont for a long time, so snow and ice was the norm for winter. Here is Oregon (Portland anyway) a 1/2″ of snow puts everyone in emergency lockdown. It’s total panic. I guess it’s just what you’re used to. πŸ˜€ πŸ˜€ πŸ˜€

      Liked by 1 person

  12. Nurse Kelly says:

    Lovely, delightful, magical – all you, Diana. Hope you have a wonderful weekend πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  13. D, this is such a lovely snippet. Well done!
    We have more than enough snow here in DC, and it’s still coming down.
    Enjoy beautiful Oregon. Mega hugs!

    Liked by 2 people

    • I’m a little jealous of your snow, Teagan, especially the first few falls of the year. Unceasing blizzards I could do without. I used to live in Vermont and don’t miss the shoveling at all. Stay warm and safe. Have a great weekend. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  14. adeleulnais says:

    Beautifully written and I loved the imagery. Thank you for posting.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Tina Frisco says:

    You write beautifully…

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Bernadette says:

    Very intriguingly written. All the contrasts and then the last sentence destroying all the differences….

    Liked by 1 person

  17. I didn’t realize it was the newer windows that prevented the ice feathers. Our ancient RV windows still get them, though. Beautiful excerpt.

    Liked by 1 person

  18. hocuspocus13 says:

    Reblogged this on hocuspocus13 and commented:
    jinxxβ›„xoxo

    Liked by 1 person

  19. inesephoto says:

    Beautiful! I can picture the ice feathers in my mind – haven’t seen them some twenty years!

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Intriguing excerpt. The photos help set the tone.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Loved the photos and your writing! Winter can be harsh but beautiful

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Judy Martin says:

    This is lovely Diana. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  23. Carrie Rubin says:

    Lovely photos, lovely words. Happy weekend to you!

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Deb says:

    This is beautiful.

    Liked by 1 person

  25. Julie says:

    The burrowers moon– how lovely. Your well chosen words complement the branch full of birds so beautifully.

    Liked by 1 person

  26. Diane Tibert says:

    The grip of winter is here though sun shines upon us today. I grew up in a home where winter laid its “fronds of ice feathers” on the windows. We would scrap them with our nails, hold our thumbs against them to melt a hole to see the world outside.

    Thank you for sharing.

    Liked by 1 person

  27. noelleg44 says:

    Beautifully written, Diana.

    Liked by 1 person

  28. davidprosser says:

    Your writing sings.
    xxx Huge Hugs xxx

    Liked by 1 person

  29. Yes indeed. Snow, prestine, clear and welcomed.

    Liked by 1 person

  30. Steven Baird says:

    Beautifully written, D.

    Liked by 1 person

  31. The V-Pub says:

    Your excerpt matched the context of your photo perfectly. Winter can be beautiful yet unforgiving.

    Liked by 1 person

  32. Sabiscuit says:

    These photos are so beautiful, Diana. I love those birds. So cute together on the branch, talking about fun times. xo

    Liked by 1 person

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