Ice Moon

moons4-cco

pixabay.com

The dawn of between-time rises gray and slick with ice. Sheets of rain turn to sleet, to snow and back to rain, the cold raw and penetrating. The first of the winter moons rims the shunting clouds in silver, the ice moon, when the world requires far less effort.

When I started writing fantasy, I found myself contemplating worlds without the modern convenience of electricity, worlds without light switches and clocks, furnaces and gas ranges. Logistics needed to be attended to, and I paid attention to the way the moon and stars lit the forest’s night sky, the way the cloud cover blocked or magnified light.

I began taking short lightless walks at night (despite the cougars and coyotes). There were nights when the woolen darkness was so thick I couldn’t see the ends of my fingertips and nights when the luminous moon cast long blue shadows. I began writing with greater attention to the seasons, the phases of the moon, the natural rhythms of the wilderness that were integral to my characters’ lives.

In the Dragon Soul Trilogy, the Ice Moon begins with the full moon’s appearance in the early winter sky. Here in Oregon, the Ice Moon bares her full face on Christmas.

My blog’s green summery background has been irking me a bit lately, so I thought for a year I would follow the moons through my fantasy world. Welcome to the Ice Moon. Happy solstice.

moons7-cco

pixabay.com

109 thoughts on “Ice Moon

  1. stevetanham says:

    I share your love of walking in the darkness. I like to walk our Collie dog in the darkness. We play fetch with a ball that flashes red so that we can both find it!

    Liked by 1 person

    • The nighttime ball game sounds fun. The dog has you well trained, Steve πŸ™‚ Sometimes it gets pitch black out here and I can’t walk because I’ll bang into my car or a tree. Other nights I could read by moonlight. Thanks for the visit!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. You studied the ever-changing light of the forest; the infinite varieties of it that exist there so that you could bring a greater authenticity to your fiction, and inject a dose of reality into your fictional worlds. I am curious – did it work? Anyway, your study of light in its natural habitat gave me an idea: live-blogging nature, perhaps keep a journal which I will call the β€œBook of Light”, and focus on the subtle variations of this intriguing phenomenon. How it appears different in different environments and my changing moods. I think that would be quite fascinating.
    Light is a wonderful energy that greets us from the harsh coldness of space. It is ethereal; yet quantifiable, and it is a powerful quantum force. It has a beauty we take too much for granted, even though it is such a precious thing; the sun’s own life-giving beneficence. Light is an astral emissary coming from far away. I want to spend a lifetime basking in light, and its endless nuances and shades. I want to fly to a tropical climate, and soak up the solar rays in all of their shifting moods on a sandy white beach. Go to the furthest reaches of Alaska, and be mesmerized by the lambent curtains of the aurora borealis. Seek out a secluded timberland above the Arctic Circle, and experience the healing lunar radiance I imagine I would find underneath the polar moon. It is wondrous beyond compare, when you think about it; photons bathing our planet in a perfect energetic bliss.
    I’m also glad that the coyotes and the bears and the wolves, and the other myriad woodland creatures, do not hinder your meditative journeys into the mysteries of the forest. There, Nature bestows you with gifts of the spirit, and you share them with all with your appreciate readers.

    Liked by 2 people

    • So eloquently stated πŸ™‚ Yes, attention to the light and moon and seasonal changes beyond my window did have an impact on my writing and the story. Communities that live more intimately with the seasons also have seasons and morph with the temperature and light. And you are so right that the quality of light changes depending where you stand in the world. πŸ™‚ Here’s a little piece on “light” from the book:

      At Elen’s table, she painted the face of a large platter, grays and whites with shadows of black and winter blue, soothing in contrast to the glow and heat of the forge. She loved the way light, the intensity and tone of it, changed the way a room looked, the way a day or night felt. Light could alter a whole landscape, change a whole world. What if she could rework the light of her way or her mother’s way? Would their lives be different bathed in the glow of firelight instead of the distant twilight of stars?

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Love this idea and look forward to seeing the changes through the coming year. Plus, the current background feels less distracting from your text. Thumbs up all round!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Amazing, thanks for sharing πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Beautiful. Thank you for sharing this snap-shot of your meditative process.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. The moon was a participant in Christmas for me this year for the first time. So I much enjoyed finding you writing about the moon and ice and fantasy worlds. I also love the snow falling through the blog!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. reocochran says:

    Diana, I spent 2 years of focusing on world events and historic dates in monthly posts. I had a friend from flashy fiction and julesgemstones, who suggested I follow the moons. I found out sometimes they have multiple names given by the Native Americans. I think this will definitely help change your perspective. I seem to always looking up. The series, Dragon Soul Trilogy, will be mentioned on my post on Dec. 30th, featuring fellow bloggers who are authors. Smiles, Robin

    Liked by 2 people

    • When I was naming the moons, I avoided researching the traditional names – opposite of what I usually do. I allowed the weather outside to guide me. It was really fun to go organic! πŸ™‚ Thanks for the mention on the 30th. That is so sweet of you. Smiles coming back your way. ❀

      Like

  8. Erik says:

    What I wouldn’t have given to have a bit of ice moon and snow-frosted pine needles here around Christmas time (it was near 70 in Boston). But we will be getting plenty soon enough.

    Liked by 2 people

  9. Sacha Black says:

    Very cool idea. When I EVENTUALLY publish I should imagine I will change my design to reflect stuff from it too. Also love your description 😊 And how much tactical research you do. That’s always an inspiration to me. I’m lining up ideas for my next book, and I need to go to COLD COLD places, I’m thinkin it’s an excuse for a trip to Iceland – although like your previous research I need to go on long boats too!

    Liked by 3 people

  10. Annika Perry says:

    I love the idea of your new bsckground and hello ice moon phase πŸ˜€. Look forward to all the others. What a great idea to follow natures lights, even at night although the local wildlife sounds rather too wild! We only get hedgehogs and pheasants round here! I used to enjoy wandering alone at night through my university town as a student, a different world to the daytime one I knew so well.

    Liked by 2 people

  11. Cat says:

    Late night walks sounds lovely, but cougars…? I’m not sure if my little Jack would hang around to protect me! Hope you’re having a nice Christmas

    Liked by 2 people

  12. Beautiful Picture πŸ˜‰

    Liked by 2 people

  13. John Maberry says:

    Nature offers wonderful inspiration for writing–not the least imagery but also ideation. Great post!

    Liked by 2 people

  14. Maverick ~ says:

    Like the new decor and Ice Moon drew me right in. Happy Holidays!

    Liked by 2 people

  15. dgkaye says:

    There’s nothing like a good feel for our surroundings to aid in our writing Diana. This was a beautiful post. Happy Solstice to you too! πŸ™‚ (And thank you for taking the time to read and generously review my book. ) ❀

    Liked by 2 people

  16. I know you had a lot going on today, so I really appreciate your posting. I hope you are not without power and heat.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Still no power, but we heat with wood anyway and are running the generator. Christmas dinner will be on the grill :-). The only challenge is water. Plenty of it but all cold! Brrr. I enjoyed posting and reading. Thanks so much for reminding me…and checking in πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  17. It is unseasonably warm in the east, which, I’m ashamed to say, has been making me much crabbier than usual.

    But at least I can take an evening walk without fear of getting mauled by a cougar.

    Have a very Happy Holiday, my friend!

    Liked by 2 people

    • These aren’t mini-cougars either, Mike. They’re lions! I take my dogs with me, but it’s questionable whether they’d stick around or run home while I’m providing the cougar with a tasty distraction πŸ™‚

      It just doesn’t feel like Christmas without a little fluff on the ground, does it? I hope you get a big snow!
      Merry Christmas and Happy New Year to you and yours

      Liked by 1 person

  18. Lovely images. Happy Christmas and happy writing!

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Juli Hoffman says:

    It’s green around here, too. Sixty-two degrees? In Michigan?? In December??? On the 23rd???? Crazy stuff. Happy Solstice!

    Liked by 2 people

  20. Heartafire says:

    Beautiful post…and your new background couldn’t be more inspiring at this time of year, love it!

    Liked by 3 people

  21. Love your new background. It’s perfect for the winter season…

    Liked by 3 people

  22. noelleg44 says:

    We have a moon but it’s supposed to be in the 70s this week. I do enjoy a book with a well-built world!

    Liked by 1 person

  23. Your background is very fitting! I hope I get a chance to see the ice moon too. More snow in the forecast but you never know!

    Liked by 2 people

  24. When I clicked onto your post and saw the background change I smiled and was like: “Yes, she did it!” Ha ha. Looks very nice. And you didn’t blow up your blog doing it πŸ™‚ Hope you have a lovely Christmas ~Tamara

    Liked by 2 people

    • Thanks for the inspiratio, Tamara. I took the easy way out and just switched out the background – It looks so different to me and I didn’t blow anything up! πŸ™‚ Lovely Christmas to you as well ❄️❄️❄️

      Liked by 1 person

  25. Judy Martin says:

    I like the look of the blog. The moon is so fascinating with its phases and the way it affects nature.

    Liked by 1 person

  26. I’ve gone through stages where I like to just have more “raw feels” experiences like going walking at night by moonlight. It makes me feel more alive somehow.

    Liked by 2 people

  27. I’ll be looking for that moon this Christmas. Really like the look of the blog. Hope you get a chance to post tomorrow to the Senior Salon.

    Liked by 2 people

  28. J M Lysun says:

    Your words are enchanting. “ice moon” is a beautiful thought!

    Liked by 2 people

  29. I love futuristic fantasy, way back with Suzanne Seizemore ect. I like your writing it is flowing and a keeps you interested. I can wait for more. (I have them all on request at the local library!) Happy Holidays Diana.

    Liked by 2 people

  30. Dan Antion says:

    We’re off to a wet and warm winter so far. The ice is a pretty sight, but I’m not going to wish for it. If it comes, so be it.

    Liked by 2 people

  31. Ocean Bream says:

    Beautiful. The moon isn’t a mystery to man anymore, but she (I like to think the Moon is a she) is still wonderfully mysterious. Walking out at night is both terrifying and thrilling, so kudos to you for that. Merry Winter and Happy Solstice.

    Liked by 2 people

  32. philipparees says:

    Your site is the most wintry we’ve seen. Here (UK) it gales and lashes and no stars or moon is visible. Nothing feel right in this temperate Christmas so this lovely post recreated it. Happy Christmas to you and yours!

    Liked by 3 people

  33. Nurse Kelly says:

    Just beautiful, Diana. I’ve always had a special bond with the moon and stars as well. We call the view from our patio “star theater,” in fact, because we have a large telescope out there that we enjoy with family and friends. Looking forward to following the moon here on your blog – happy solstice and winter to you as well! Here’s to longer days!

    Liked by 2 people

  34. balroop2013 says:

    The picture, the background the words…all merge into each other to create perfect imagery! Is it poetry Diana? I thought so!
    I love your blog all the more…enjoy your Christmas and have a blessed time with your ‘Icy moon!’

    Liked by 2 people

  35. Jed Jurchenko says:

    It’s snowing on your blog! That’s awesome. Sadly, this is about as close to real snow as we are going to get this year. I love the descriptive language, and beautiful, site update.

    Liked by 2 people

    • We don’t have any snow yet here, Jed. Last year only on flurry with an inch of accumulation. This snowy scene is pure imagination, though the weather forecasters told us 2 feet for Christmas. Very exciting! Merry Christmas to you and your family πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  36. Love nighttime walks, though I don’t have to worry about cougars where I live (coyotes, yes). It’s great to walk under the full moon–never heard the term ice moon, but I like it. Great feels in this post–thanks, Diana!

    Liked by 2 people

  37. A perfect image, Diana. Happy Winter. ❄️ ❄️ ❄️

    Liked by 1 person

  38. I’ve heard of artists suffering for their art, but please don’t get eaten by a cougar! Even if it *did* do wonders for your sales.

    “Have you read Sunwielder”?
    ” Isn’t that the one written by the crazy lady who got eaten by a coala?”
    “It was a cougar, actually, and she wasn’t crazy, just committed to her art. But yeah.”
    “No, but I saw the movie. Great stuff.”

    Liked by 4 people

  39. joannesisco says:

    I’ve never heard of the Ice Moon before, but I am looking forward to the full moon on Christmas Day … like I do every full moon. There is a beauty and mystery about it.

    Your background photo is so beautiful and appropriate for the season! Happy Solstice and hope you have a lovely week πŸ™‚

    Liked by 5 people

  40. It’s those kind of thoughts that make you the wonderful writer that you are, Diana.

    Liked by 4 people

  41. The V-Pub says:

    It’s details like tracking celestial movements that make stories more immersive. It’s as thought time stopped at Stonehenge in a way. I think that the landscape of world devoid of convenience helps making the character more sympathetic as well.

    Liked by 3 people

Comments are warmly welcomed. Don't be shy .

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s