Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus

Image from wikimedia

Image from wikimedia

Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus. He exists as certainly as love and generosity and devotion exists, and you know that they abound and give to your life its highest beauty and joy.
~Charles A. Dana

The Overlord’s parents decided to be truthful about the existence of Santa Claus. He’s 2 years old, mind you.

“You don’t believe in Santa?” I asked my daughter, aghast at the notion.

“We don’t want to mislead him or lie to him,” she said.

“How do you know there’s no Santa?” I asked, sensing her ambivalence. “How do you know there’s no such thing as magic?”

Her mother writes fantasy. What did she expect?

This conversation got me thinking about how little I actually “know.” I’m fairly certain I know my thoughts and feelings and perhaps a glimmer of what I perceive with my senses. But that’s about it. I drew a pie chart to demonstrate:

Pie Chart

Figure 1. Pie Chart of Ignorance

There are various things we humans agree upon and, therefore, have decided are “true.” For example, many of us believe gold is valuable when, if you think about it, it’s really just rock. Collectively, we ascribe values to all sorts of tangible items, and we conform to these “realities.” Move into the realm of thought and the tendency is no different.

What is “real” and “true” for me changes over time as I gain experience and ask the what-if and why questions that rattle around in my pea-brain. I imagine scientists also ponder imaginative possibilities. Otherwise, discoveries would only occur by accident. For scientists, theories become fact when proven. Yet how often are “truths” revised as more evidence surfaces, as our knowledge grows? All the time.

So, just because something can’t be proved using our limited senses and machinery, doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist. Just because we can’t discover or measure it now, doesn’t mean we won’t in the future.

I enjoy this uncertainty. I like living with fathomless possibilities. This is where the heart of faith and spirit lies. For me, this is the realm of ghosts and angels, a sentient symbiotic planet, karma and destiny, aliens and gods. I can believe in our ability to manifest the universe through our choices, that words can change a life, that thoughts have tactile power, that love can be sent through the air like an arrow or a wave, that our understanding/categorizing/defining/ values may be flawed because we see only a minute sliver of the whole picture.

So, I’m open to the possibility of everything, to the existence of magic … and the presence of Santa Claus.

Happy Holidays.

108 thoughts on “Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus

  1. John Maberry says:

    I have never been able to find the source, but I recall now and then, “as the he diameter of my knowledge increases, the cicumference of my ignorance expands.” Not entirely apropos but your post brought it to mind.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. “What is “real” and “true” for me changes over time as I gain experience and ask the what-if and why questions.. ” – if only others recognized this, too.
    Revel in the revels.
    May your Christmas be merry and bright!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. inesephoto says:

    Happy Holidays to you too!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. noelleg44 says:

    I think if you believe in magic and keep a childlike wonder about Christmas, you will never grow old!

    Liked by 2 people

  5. kutukamus says:

    Indeed, what we believe counts 🙂 Happy holidays!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. The heart and mind of a miracle worker is a wondrous gift any time of year, D. That you for sharing your magic 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Nurse Kelly says:

    This post is just breathtaking, Diana, especially that last paragraph. It’s truly prolific. Only a person who possesses real magic within could have written that. That pie chart is a misrepresentation of you!

    I feel bad that The Overlord was informed at the age of 2… but he does have you to keep all the magic and excitement alive for years to come!

    Happy holidays to you and your wonderful family! xo

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Well said. Santa is all kinds of awesome.

    The Elf om the Shelf, on the other hand, is a Orwellian bureaucrat from the NSA.

    Liked by 2 people

  9. We human beings are very good at picking up one thread of thought, following it all the way through to the end, and then filling in for all those other threads( that run in another direction and contradict our conclusion) and fill in he gaps with imagination. This is a wonderful post but on the pie chart I’d add a huge chunk for what we imagine we know.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Erik says:

    I’m so with you on this! In light of the recent storms and flooding your way, and this wonderful post, I hope you won’t mind my sharing my thoughts via a post link: the gods are angry. I just feel very passionately about what you’ve said here and wanted to provide an option for further thought, if anyone would like it.

    So many great thoughts in the comments here, as well!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. dgkaye says:

    I’m with you on all counts Diana. I’m a believer in the universe and laws of attraction. I’m a believer in believing, and that anything is possible, and that life can turn on a dime. I don’t like to judge other’s decisions, but I would definitely choose to share the illusion. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  12. It is liberating to know what you don’t know. As far as I can tell everything is magic.

    Liked by 2 people

  13. It is amazing just how much we don’t know about our universe, isn’t it? Even so, it sure would be nice if the Overlord could just have fun believing in Santa Claus for a few years. Have a Merry Christmas, Diana, and may Santa be good to you!

    Liked by 3 people

  14. Sacha Black says:

    Erm…. Have they been to Lapland?! I hear there’s a full blown Santa grotto sleigh and genuine Rudolph!

    Isn’t it just nice whilst it lasts? Children grow up too fast, it’s nice to keep their innocence for a while at least.

    Liked by 4 people

  15. Annika Perry says:

    A wonderful post, Diana. These uncertainties that enthral you, used to absolute terrify me. The ‘what ifs’ were like a giant canyon of doom. I often used to wonder what would happen to the world if people realised that those bits of paper, those bits of metal were only that and not money. I was filled with dread. Now the possibilities are more exciting, my thoughts enjoying the scenarios. There is such beauty in your words and I love this sentence: ‘I can believe in our ability to manifest the universe through our choices, that words can change a life, that thoughts have tactile power, that love can be sent through the air like an arrow or a wave.’ Wishing you and your family a Christmas filled with bountiful magic and joy.

    Liked by 2 people

  16. Jed Jurchenko says:

    This is such a beautiful post. It makes me happy and sad at the same time. Happy, because it keeps the magic alive. Sad, because my oldest daughter is turning nine-years-old. At some point, we’ll need to have a conversation about St. Nick.

    Jenny and I have been debating, “Do we not say anything and risk her being embarrassed when she finds out from her friends, or do we find a gentle way to diminish the magic our selves?”

    We haven’t decided how to solve this puzzle yet. For now, we are cherishing every second of our daughter’s delight in the magic of the season 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    • I feel for you, Jed. It is a hard decision that I’m sure you’ll handle beautifully. The “person” of Santa may not visit your house, but the magic of giving and the spirit of Father Christmas goes on. Merry Christmas to you and your family. 🙂

      Like

    • Erik says:

      If it’s not already part of your tradition, try reading The Polar Express together. The symbolism of the bell opens a pathway to discussion and questions (e.g., “Why don’t you think the adults could hear the bell in this story?” … “Do you think the boy really took a train ride or dreamed it?” … [If “He dreamed it” is entertained] “Where do you think the bell might have come from, if not from Santa?” … “Is a make-believe story fun, or do you feel like it’s lying to tell a make-believe story like this?”).

      Liked by 2 people

  17. Julie says:

    Here’s to visions of sugarplums– well done! Merry Christmas to you.

    Liked by 2 people

  18. reocochran says:

    Diana, when I was a like child, the stork brought babies, the tooth fairy “bought” my missing teeth, Easter Bunny brought me stuffed bunny or chick, candy and a pretty basket while bringing my “Mommy” a corsage fir church and an Easter Lily for the table and lastly, Santa Claus brought us each (3 of us, I the eldest) one nice gift and some little presents, too.
    My “Daddy” was a nuclear engineer who liked science and “Mommy” was a high school teacher. We went to church and learned about Jesus, loving our neighbors and giving spirits. We learned proper body part names since I had 2 brothers, I learned Mommy and Daddy could kiss and make up and we learned about black children from working in the summer at Head Start in a basement of a city church. We learned about the “birds and the bees” when we were only 11, 9 and 7. 🙂
    I feel life is full of few mysteries or joys as holidays. Not the gifts but the whole packaged “deal.” Nature and love come together in the decorations which brighten even the barest of homes. ♡ I have bern saying to others, “Follow the Star. . .” ☆

    Liked by 2 people

    • It is the whole deal, isn’t it? The conglomeration of good intentions and positive experiences builds resilience. It sounds like you had a wonderful balance of magic and down to earth information, Robin. I love it. 🙂 Have a wonderful holiday – follow the Star. ❤

      Liked by 1 person

  19. I’m with you on this, Diana. We’re so arrogant as a species, with all our changeable certainties. Room for the possible is desirable, necessary and a writer’s best friend.
    Happy holidays to you and yours. I hope all has returned to normal with your weather and living conditions.x

    Liked by 3 people

  20. I loved this. Thanks for the inspiration – now I know what to tell our wee one when she asks about Santa 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  21. balroop2013 says:

    Hi Diana,

    I am all for fun and Santa but what hits my heart is the lie, which kids discover once they are a little big as their curious questions can’t keep the lies multiplying…we have to agree with what they know!
    I wonder what answer will my grandchildren receive as I keep asking my daughter how long will Santa keep eating those cookies she keeps by the tree and my little grand daughter is so quick with her questions!
    Happy Holidays and Merry Christmas!

    Liked by 3 people

    • Ah, the same ambivalence my daughter feels. I believed in Santa as a kid, and it was great fun even though at some point I learned that he wasn’t coming down the chimney. I’m so glad my parents didn’t deny me those magical years, and I’ve continued to embrace the magic and excitement beyond childhood. 🙂 Enjoy your holiday with your grandchildren!

      Liked by 4 people

    • Erik says:

      When we read our children stories, do we feel the need to say, “But just so you know, the Velveteen Rabbit isn’t real” or “Boys don’t REALLY go to magical places where monsters are their friends” or “Spiders and pigs can’t really talk and write”? No. We just read with them. And we encourage imagination in so doing. When we read Charlotte’s Web, are we lying to our children, leading them to believe that animals can talk? And what if we see our children actually talking to animals? Are we allowing empathy to build, or lying?

      I would suggest that the Santa story is no different. We allow children to explore the world of their imagination, while at the same time learning more about the world around them, discovering it for themselves, all the while remaining available to ask questions or answer any they may have at the right time. And that seems to me to be a gift, not a lie.

      Just my take.

      Liked by 3 people

      • balroop2013 says:

        I appreciate your perspective Erik…imagination is so fascinating and I am glad you are eager to answer those questions, which the curious children ask. So do I! Thanks for reading my view and responding.

        Liked by 2 people

      • Great point about children’s books. Communication would be difficult if we had to give everything a “reality” check. I think adults are aculturated to lose the ability to perceive spirit and magic. And look what a nice job we’ve done with the world 🙂

        Liked by 2 people

  22. I am with you all the way, Diane. Happy Christmas!

    Liked by 2 people

  23. Fabio says:

    Magic writing, Diana! Certainly Santa will be good to you! Thanks so much! Happy Holidays! 🙂 XX

    Liked by 2 people

  24. Susanne has introduced us, for which I am grateful. (As my writing teacher’s nephew says, “Great minds stink alike.”) I think the problem with believing you know all there is to know is you won’t ever know anything new. Even more importantly, we might as well make life as interesting as possible while we’re here.

    Liked by 6 people

  25. I love this part… “So, just because something can’t be proved using our limited senses and machinery, doesn’t mean it doesn’t exist. Just because we can’t discover or measure it now, doesn’t mean we won’t in the future.” So true… we have to be open to the possibility of so many things that we can’t possibly ever fully understand… 🙂

    Liked by 5 people

  26. tric says:

    What great thoughts. Love it.
    Santa is very real. He is still alive and kicking in this house and my gang are 13 to 24 years old. Santa letters written and fingers crossed by all four of them. There is magic and more than normal at Christmas

    Liked by 4 people

  27. Great post! Wishing you a Very Merry Christmas. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  28. Love it Diane, your pie chart is perfect. Everyone needs to remember that when they say something is impossible. Just because you can’t do it, and no one else has before, doesn’t mean it’s not possible.

    Liked by 3 people

  29. Of course Santa Claus is real! Merry Christmas Diana!

    Liked by 3 people

  30. I believe in magic, and ghosts, and fantasy, and all things spiritual and unexplained. Why not ??? Great post, Diana. ❤️ 💛 💙 💜

    Liked by 3 people

  31. davidprosser says:

    Of course I exist. I just get very busy, especially this time of year. But direct yourself to my last blog post and there I an in my Sunday Best grandson on knee.
    It’s my job to spread joy and I try my best all year round but frankly I get a little diminished by the naysayers and the world loses a little of it’s warmth. Tell her to step up to the plate for the youngster who should have he same opportunity she had to mess things up.
    Have a Wonderful Christmas,
    xxx Massive Hugs to spread around xxx

    Liked by 3 people

    • I think she’s come around, David. She’s seeing how much joy there is in the magical. How lovely that you as instrumental in spreading joy. Don’t listen to the naysayers and keep up the hugs – they make a difference. Merry Christmas and massive hugs back to you 😀

      Liked by 2 people

  32. Yes, love this! Have a magical holiday!

    Liked by 3 people

  33. Judy Martin says:

    We all need to have some magic in our lives 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

  34. “What is beautiful is a joy for all seasons” Oscar Wilde. I do believe, even when the world is falling apart!

    Liked by 3 people

  35. There is always room for magic in my box…..

    Liked by 3 people

  36. Susanne says:

    As a young person I had difficulty dealing with ambiguity but I find with advancing years, like you, I like the possibilities presented with uncertainty. That’s where creativity lives. Lovely post.

    Liked by 3 people

  37. Happy Holidays, Diana. Hope Santa brings you something nice. Like a book! 😉

    Liked by 3 people

  38. joannesisco says:

    “our understanding/categorizing/defining/ values may be flawed because we see only a minute sliver of the whole picture” … that says it all!!
    I chose to believe in magic 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

  39. Dan Antion says:

    Love the chart 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

  40. The V-Pub says:

    I totally agree with you, Diana. A world without magic, ghosts, woodland elves and faeries is too boring and clinical for me. I’m waiting for Santa instead.

    Liked by 4 people

Comments are warmly welcomed. Don't be shy .

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s