Why We Can’t See Our Tpyos

Did you see it?

The spelling mitsake in the tilte of this post?

Here’s how our amzaing brains igonre poor spelling:  

typo1

Our brains are increidbly vesratile.

No more stressing abuot tpyos!

Did you catch all 10 of my tpyos?

154 thoughts on “Why We Can’t See Our Tpyos

  1. Reblogged this on Kate McClelland and commented:
    Wow! It’s similar to when you read something that’s upside down

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Nick Verron says:

    I have fist hand experience of how versatile and maaznig the human brian is! :-))

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Zoe says:

    Reblogged this on The Life & Times of Zoe the Fabulous Feline and commented:
    Graet artilce and yup! I cuaght all tne!!! meooooow

    Liked by 1 person

  4. reocochran says:

    I am chuckling heartily, Diane! 🙂 I was prepared for you to say my eyes’ ability is going downhill to discern typos. Aging is a pain since on my phone I type “s” which is next to “a” many times on comments. This is not so bad as when my cell phone thinks it knows what I am typing. I should proofread all the time but sometimes life or a phone call comes in and I just push the post comment button.
    You are so right about your title, probably wouldn’t have given it a second thought. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Phones are a whole other problem. Who has fingers that small? I can’t type worth beans on those and the “guess” feature comes up with some crazy suggestions. I gave up trying to edit those and just let them fly. My daughter has to call me back to see what I want. Ha ha.

      Like

  5. ruthgjuliano says:

    Shared on Facebook. I feel better now, thank you. I read and reread my ebooks before I put them out there and then next time I read them, BOOM typo. Human? Yes.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. dorne whale says:

    Reblogged this on Write Dorne – Putting life into words. and commented:
    Liked this, so reblogging it. And yes I can read it…can you?

    Liked by 1 person

  7. gina amos says:

    Diana, you certainly received a lot of comments on this post!. An amazing exercise. It isn’t any wonder how we miss those pesky typos!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. 😀 😀 How deceiving our eyes can be. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  9. jamoroki says:

    Thanks fro asuming me tadoy Pratick

    Liked by 1 person

  10. […] Source: Why We Can’t See Our Tpyos […]

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Reblogged this on Smorgasbord – Variety is the spice of life and commented:
    Diana Wallace Peach of Myths of the Mirror and a post about not stressing about tupos – sometimes our fungers work fister than our brains which aslo have predictive toxt.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. GP Cox says:

    Yup – you’re rihgt, brezeed right thru it!! O_o

    Liked by 2 people

  13. I had no problem! But I have a touch of dyslexia.

    Liked by 1 person

  14. That was really interesting , Diana. I’m always learning new things. I could read it, but had to take a little time on some words. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Sacha Black says:

    Hularious! Propor maid me larf this did!!
    Did u c wot I did theer ? Hard 2 mayk thsi manee mistayks !! 😂😂😂😂😂

    Liked by 2 people

  16. D.G.Kaye says:

    I had no problem reading. What does this make me? LOL 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  17. If you’re dyslexic it’s even more of a struggle as your brain grabs information and concepts rather than individual letters as those jump around and exchange locations within words frequently. (Depending on unreliable spell check isn’t that much of a help either as it sees what it wants to see not what writer is trying to say.)

    Liked by 1 person

  18. […] vocation pops up in my opinions and commentary. Since my previous post broached the topic of brains, I thought it might be easy fun to share something from my previous life – an article I wrote on […]

    Like

  19. Typos are the hardest and most annoying things in a writers life. I can never spot my own…It’s like they hide from me on purpose.

    Liked by 2 people

  20. Susan Langer says:

    LOL. That the reason a college graduate that writes (me) needs Grammarly to spell check for me. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  21. I’m famuos for tpyos especailly in the commants section when I don’t look over my sentnece carefully enugh before posting. Lol! 😉

    Loved it D!

    Liked by 2 people

  22. Widdershins says:

    I read it from go the whoa without any trouble. Le sigh! 😀

    Liked by 1 person

  23. Well, after reading this I am revisiting my decision to give up my subscriptions to Grammarly.

    Liked by 1 person

  24. I noticed two of your ten typos :p Sad, LOL!

    Liked by 1 person

  25. OMG! I can totally read it! lol! That’s why my proofreader friend is going crazy correcting my typos 😉
    Guess proofreaders and line editors have special super-powers to notice all the mistakes.

    Liked by 2 people

  26. This post really illustrates the need for proofreading using every trick we can come up with to make the errors pop out and then getting 2nd and maybe even 3rd opinions. True – most people will skim right over and never even notice but we need to produce clean copy for those readers who will take note and be knocked out of our story by the error. At the end of the day, we don’t want anything to detract readers from the story. Great post.

    Liked by 2 people

    • You are so right. The post is funny and interesting, but it points clearly to why proofreading support is so vital. I have no less than 6 proofreaders (sometimes more) and errors still get through. I’ve added reading my work backwards – the only part of writing that I utterly loathe, but it’s worth the effort.

      Liked by 1 person

  27. Jed Jurchenko says:

    Hey Diana,

    There are typos in there? 🙂

    Spelling has never been my strong suite. I’m a writer who is very thankful for spellcheck, and for some good friends who point out my most egregious writing errors, so that I can fix then quickly. It’s nice to know that not being able to see one’s own mistakes is normal, and these challenges are by no means unique to me.

    Liked by 3 people

  28. Rajagopal says:

    Right you are, Diana, as one can read it without much ado regardless of jumbled spellings. But one cannot make it a norm, as incorrect spellings, to me, detracts from beauty of writing..

    Liked by 2 people

  29. What a fun way to make the point! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  30. I spotted all ten typos, took me a few seconds, but I did.
    I was able to read everything in the image too without much difficulty. It was easier when I simply glanced over it than studying each word, interesting.
    Great post with humor to end the week.

    Liked by 2 people

  31. I didn’t see the typo until you mentioned there was one. I read the article with no issues. The mind is amazing!

    Liked by 1 person

  32. I finally forced myself to stop liking every comment. I just enjoyed them so much.

    Liked by 2 people

  33. Dawn D says:

    Well… it depends. Did you include the one in the title in your count? If yes, then I did. If not… I’m at a loss!
    And yes, typos are awful! That’s why we always need someone to look over any text before we can be sure we didn’t miss any. Our brain knows what we wanted to write and instantly reads it the way we want it to be instead of the way it actually is. :-/

    Liked by 2 people

  34. Kev says:

    That’s my mind on a good day! 😀

    Liked by 2 people

  35. balroop2013 says:

    Quite interesting!I am too well versed in spotting spelling errors…being a teacher who has spent almost half of my life in this profession, and that too of English!

    Liked by 2 people

    • Now you know why some of your pupils will insist that they proofread their papers and still have spelling errors. You’re lucky to have a precise eye, Balroop. I wish I did! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    • I have typos all the time and my letter writing skills aren’t the best any more. Heath reasons there.
      It’s hard for me because I remember how good I once was. I wrote for newspapers/ Small town ones.
      I have a Master’s Degree. I studied English Lit. I was an English major all thru high school and college.
      I taught school for 17 years and then taught preschool in my home.
      Now I struggle.

      Liked by 2 people

      • I’m so sorry about your health challenges, Sarah. I can’t imagine how hard you’re struggling. If it’s any help, your writing is still beautiful and clear and heartfelt, and I would never describe it as lacking in any way. I’m going to head over and read. I know I’m right. ❤

        Liked by 2 people

        • That means a lot to me. It really does.
          I notice things I do or say wrong but for the life of me, I can’t remember what I need to say/write.
          I use I all the time. I this. I that.
          The more I am writing and sharing here, the more unafraid I am.
          Unafraid is not the right word but I can’t think of the correct one.
          I just write what I want to write now.
          Before, when I first started here, I wasn’t writing much..Certainly not as open as I do now. I share more from other blogs.
          🙂

          Liked by 3 people

          • Often we are hardest on ourselves, aren’t we? I truly believe that what most people value is authenticity and heart, because in so many ways, despite our differences, we are alike and can relate to the human experience. If you are writing from your heart – whatever that looks like – it will be valued and appreciated by your readers. With everything else going on in your life, relax and allow your writing to be worry free. ❤

            Liked by 1 person

  36. Steven Baird says:

    That was fun. I (eventually) caught your typos, too. So the question is… why can’t I find my own typos when I proofread my own copy? Most of them, yes, but some are eulusive no matter how many times I read over them. I think they’re like houseflies. You know they’re there, but when you start chasing them….

    Liked by 2 people

  37. Ocean Bream says:

    Oh wow! How fascinating! I chuckled to myself because no matter how MANY times I read the title I did NOT see the typo until …. I saw it 😀

    Liked by 2 people

  38. Jay says:

    I’m dyslexic, so my brain literally stops me from recognizing those errors. It’s very frustrating but it can lead to some hilarious mistakes.

    Liked by 4 people

  39. Wow…ths is too incrdibel! I found tht I coud reed every word! I hve to rblog ths!!

    Liked by 3 people

  40. Heartafire says:

    I wondered if it is a mild dyslexia? I actually write that way sometimes! Thanks for the smile.

    Liked by 3 people

  41. babbitman says:

    I used to do a lot of proof-reading so tend to spot other peoples’ typos (but usually miss my own). I was awarded a commendation a few years ago; at the award ceremony, the certificate was barely in my hand when I spotted a spelling mistake on it. Doh.

    Liked by 5 people

  42. orangepondconnects says:

    Well….that just explains all my typo errors! lol

    Liked by 2 people

  43. I only saw a few, Diana, and certainly not the tpyo in your tilte ! ☺

    Liked by 1 person

  44. Annette Rochelle Aben says:

    I saw waht you did there

    Liked by 1 person

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